NPR Staff

Pages

Author Interviews
5:52 am
Sat June 20, 2015

Survival Is Insufficient: 'Station Eleven' Preserves Art After The Apocalypse

Originally published on Sat June 20, 2015 10:40 am

Emily St. John Mandel's new novel, Station Eleven, opens with a vain actor — and is there really any other kind? — who dies of a heart attack onstage as he plays King Lear in Toronto. His co-stars can't remember if he had a family to notify. But soon, within minutes, the death of one man playing Lear disappears into the vast, mass death of a worldwide plague called the Georgia Flu.

Read more
Movie Interviews
5:03 am
Fri June 19, 2015

'Sadness Is Like A Superhero': Amy Poehler On Pixar's 'Inside Out'

"[Sadness is] such a funny opposite energy to Joy, who is literally jumping up and down," Poehler says. "And Sadness just wants to lie down and kind of feel her feelings." Poehler plays Joy (left) and Phyllis Smith plays Sadness in the new film Inside Out.
Disney/Pixar

Originally published on Sun June 21, 2015 12:37 pm

A new animated feature from Pixar aims to do the near-impossible, as any parent would tell you: get inside the mind of a preteen girl. Inside Out is about an 11-year-old girl named Riley, but the real stars are her emotions — five colorful characters representing joy, sadness, anger, fear and disgust.

Pete Docter, the creative force behind Up and Monsters, Inc., wrote and directed the film, and actress Amy Poehler plays Joy. Both of them laugh about one of the biggest challenges of the movie: deciding how many emotions to include.

Read more
Interviews
5:03 am
Fri June 19, 2015

'I'm So Proud To Have You As A Daughter'

Mario Loiseau and his daughter Mabou during a recent visit to StoryCorps.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri June 19, 2015 12:20 pm

Mario Loiseau works two jobs, including long hours as a parking lot attendant, to help pay for his 9-year-old daughter Mabou's tutoring. Mabou is a science and language prodigy and is already studying college-level algebra.

"So Daddy, how did you feel when I was born?" she asked her father during a recent visit to StoryCorps in New York City.

Read more
The Two-Way
6:17 pm
Thu June 18, 2015

The Victims: 9 Were Slain At Charleston's Emanuel AME Church

Charleston residents visit a makeshift memorial for victims of Wednesday's mass shooting at the Emanuel AME Church on Calhoun Steet in Charleston, S.C.
Randall Hill Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Sat June 20, 2015 8:44 pm

The nine people who were killed in a mass shooting at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, S.C., on Wednesday have been identified by the authorities.

Read more
Author Interviews
6:27 pm
Sun June 14, 2015

'You Couldn't Make This Stuff Up': Inside The Lives Of The 'China Rich'

Lydia Thompson NPR

Originally published on Mon June 15, 2015 1:06 pm

In his 2014 novel Crazy Rich Asians, author Kevin Kwan took readers to Singapore and into the lives of Asia's elite, who live in a world of opulence so extreme, it's absurd.

The novel became an international best-seller, with a movie in the works.

Now those Crazy Rich Asians are back as a mix of old and new characters in Kwan's new novel, China Rich Girlfriend.

Read more
Health
6:14 pm
Sun June 14, 2015

'Man With The Golden Arm' Donates Blood That Has Saved 2 Million Babies

James Harrison was recognized in 2003 with the Guinness World Record for the most blood donated by one person.
DAVID GRAY Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Mon June 15, 2015 11:20 am

When James Harrison was 14, he got really sick. One of his lungs had to be removed, and he needed a lot of blood.

"I was in the hospital for three months and I had 100 stitches," he recalls.

After receiving 13 units — almost 2 gallons — of donated blood, Harrison knew right away that he wanted to give back.

"I was always looking forward to donating, right from the operation, because I don't know how many people it took to save my life," he says. "I never met them, didn't know them."

Read more
Science
5:13 pm
Sun June 14, 2015

In Massachusetts Lab, Scientists Grow An Artificial Rat Limb

In the study, muscle cells were injected into the cell-free "scaffolding" of a rat limb, which provided shape and structure onto which regenerated tissue could grow.
Bernhard Jank, MD Ott Laboratory, Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Regenerative Medicine

Originally published on Mon June 15, 2015 7:00 am

A team of scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston made news earlier this month when they published research in the journal Biomaterials describing how they'd created the world's first bioartificial limb in the laboratory.

Or, in other words: scientists have now grown the entire forelimb of a rat in a lab.

Read more
Music Interviews
5:13 pm
Sun June 14, 2015

The Hills Are Alive: Maria Schneider Lets Memory Guide The Music

Maria Schneider's latest album is The Thompson Fields.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun June 14, 2015 10:41 pm

Read more
Arts & Life
8:18 am
Sun June 14, 2015

Shooting Barbs At The Stars: Kathy Griffin On Comedy And Intolerance

Kathy Griffin, onstage for her Like a Boss Tour.
David A. Beloff Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 14, 2015 11:02 am

Kathy Griffin has spent her career going for the joke. The comedian has developed a style that eviscerates celebrities, while sharing delightfully bizarre stories that could only happen in Hollywood.

Along the way, she's won fans who feel she tells it like it is ... and enemies who think she goes too far.

On her new tour, called "Like A Boss," Griffin will be traveling to 80 cities between June and December. And, she tells NPR's Rachel Martin, no topics are off-limits — even Caitlyn Jenner.

Read more
Music
2:03 am
Sun June 14, 2015

Charlie Hunter: One Less String Attached

Charlie Hunter.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun June 14, 2015 11:02 am

The last time Charlie Hunter came to the NPR studios, he brought an eight-string guitar with fanned-out frets that included bass strings. He's now pared down to just seven strings, but his guitar still produces a big, fat sound. Let The Bells Ring On is Hunter's new album, and it features two jazz innovators: trombonist Curtis Fowlkes and drummer Bobby Previte. It's a record that goes every which way, but in places is rooted in gospel and the music on which he grew up.

Read more
Sports
5:10 pm
Sat June 13, 2015

Academic Foul: Some Colleges Accused Of Helping Athletes Cheat

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill faces charges of NCAA violations including the existence of sham classes and grade inflation for student-athletes.
Gerry Broome AP

Originally published on Sat June 13, 2015 6:21 pm

Some college athletes are cheating, and the NCAA is cracking down on universities that enable them to do it. Earlier this year, the NCAA came down hard on Syracuse University for academic fraud.

Read more
Author Interviews
5:10 pm
Sat June 13, 2015

'Seven Good Years' Between The Birth Of A Son, Death Of A Father

Lydia Thompson NPR

Originally published on Sat June 13, 2015 6:21 pm

Israeli writer Etgar Keret is beloved around the world for his funny, haunting and frequently fantastical short stories. But he's hardly one to stick to a single medium: on top of his stories, he's written graphic novels, TV shows, movie scripts and a children's book. And public radio fans may know his work from its numerous appearances on This American Life.

But for 25 years — whether in print, on air, on screen or in comic-book form — he only wrote fiction.

Read more
Music Interviews
5:10 pm
Sat June 13, 2015

Bridging The Decades: Leon Bridges' Soulful 'Coming Home'

Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat June 13, 2015 6:21 pm

Soul singer Leon Bridges is 25 years old, from Fort Worth, Texas — and he's about to blow up. The first tracks from his forthcoming debut album, Coming Home, started to sneak out a few months ago, and they've already become hits online. From the moment he went viral, people were quick to compare his sound and look that of to Sam Cooke.

But Bridges says he didn't find his way into music through Cooke — in fact, he only started listening to him around two years ago.

Read more
Author Interviews
5:21 am
Sat June 13, 2015

Lawyer Argues That Virtual Trials Would Make Justice System More Fair

Lydia Thompson NPR

Originally published on Mon June 15, 2015 2:18 pm

The death of Kalief Browder shined more harsh light on the American justice system. Browder was held at New York's Rikers Island prison complex for three years after being accused of stealing a backpack at 16. He was never tried, much less convicted, but spent nearly two years in solitary confinement and was savaged by gangs. Browder was finally released with no charges in 2013, but suffered aftereffects from incarceration.

Read more
StoryCorps
3:25 am
Fri June 12, 2015

This Teen Wanted To Die, But An Officer Told Him 'Don't Give Up'

Sean Fitzpatrick (right) with John Gately, at StoryCorps.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri June 12, 2015 10:34 am

Eleven years ago, Sean Fitzpatrick was a high school junior in Spokane, Wash. He had developed paranoid schizophrenia and was hearing voices — though he didn't tell anyone.

One morning, Fitzpatrick went to school with a gun and a plan: To barricade himself in a classroom, pretend he had hostages, and force police to kill him.

His plan didn't work, though at the end of the standoff he was shot in the face and still has difficulty speaking.

Read more
Music Interviews
4:28 am
Thu June 11, 2015

Back To Baltimore And 'Back 2 Love' With R&B Singer Maysa

Maysa, whose new album Back 2 Love is out now, is a music industry veteran and a Baltimore native.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu June 11, 2015 11:30 am

Baltimore is struggling with record violence: Last month the murder rate hit a 40-year high. NPR has been talking about this problem with law enforcement officials and politicians — and now, it hands the microphone to one of the city's artists.

Read more
Author Interviews
4:25 pm
Tue June 9, 2015

Napoleon In America: Not As Strange As It Sounds

Robert Siegel interviews Munro Price, author of Napoleon: End of Glory about napoleon's failed plan to relocate to America after the defeat at Waterloo.
Courtesy of OUP

Originally published on Wed June 10, 2015 10:25 am

Here's a preposterous idea: Napoleon Bonaparte, defeated at Waterloo, his 15-year run as dictator, conqueror and self-crowned emperor at an end, escapes to the United States. Well, as preposterous as that idea might sound, 200 years ago this month, Napoleon Bonaparte was thinking precisely that thought: Flee to America. How serious was he, and what would he have done if he'd become a Jersey boy? Munro Price is a professor of modern European history at Bradford University in England and the author of Napoleon: End of Glory.

Read more
Intelligence Squared U.S.
12:21 pm
Tue June 9, 2015

Debate: Does The Equal Protection Clause Require States To License Same-Sex Marriage?

Samuel LaHoz Intelligence Squared U.S.

The Equal Protection Clause of the 14th Amendment provides: "No State shall ... deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws." But, in 1868, when the Equal Protection Clause was ratified, gay marriage was inconceivable.

Some states have legalized gay marriage, while others have not. But is this one of those things that democracy does not get to decide? Is this a thing that the Constitution removes from the democratic process? Does the Equal Protection Clause require that?

Read more
Author Interviews
3:54 am
Tue June 9, 2015

If Jimmy Fallon Gets His Way, 'Your Baby's First Word Will Be Dada'

Fallon's new book has a daddy bee, dog, rabbit, cat and donkey (one of his personal favorites) all trying — and failing — to get their babies to say "dada."
Macmillan Children's Publishing Group

Originally published on Tue June 9, 2015 10:16 am

A lot of things seem to come easy for The Tonight Show's Jimmy Fallon: comedy, music, dancing. Fatherhood didn't. Fallon and his wife struggled with fertility issues for years before they had their two daughters. Now one is almost 2, the other is not yet 1 and both are the inspiration for Fallon's new children's book, Your Baby's First Word Will Be Dada.

Read more
Michel Martin, Going There
3:31 am
Tue June 9, 2015

The #BlackLivesMatter Movement: Marches And Tweets For Healing

Desiree Griffiths of Miami holds up a sign reading "Black Lives Matter" during a protest over the deaths of Michael Brown and Eric Garner.
Lynne Sladky AP

Originally published on Tue June 9, 2015 2:02 pm

In 2013, after George Zimmerman was acquitted for killing 17-year-old Trayvon Martin, a young woman in California named Alicia Garza wrote an emotional Facebook post that ended with the words "Our Lives Matter, Black Lives Matter." Her friend, Patrisse Cullors, turned that into a hashtag.

Read more

Pages