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5:10 pm
Sat June 13, 2015

Academic Foul: Some Colleges Accused Of Helping Athletes Cheat

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill faces charges of NCAA violations including the existence of sham classes and grade inflation for student-athletes.
Gerry Broome AP

Originally published on Sat June 13, 2015 6:21 pm

Some college athletes are cheating, and the NCAA is cracking down on universities that enable them to do it. Earlier this year, the NCAA came down hard on Syracuse University for academic fraud.

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Author Interviews
5:10 pm
Sat June 13, 2015

'Seven Good Years' Between The Birth Of A Son, Death Of A Father

Lydia Thompson NPR

Originally published on Sat June 13, 2015 6:21 pm

Israeli writer Etgar Keret is beloved around the world for his funny, haunting and frequently fantastical short stories. But he's hardly one to stick to a single medium: on top of his stories, he's written graphic novels, TV shows, movie scripts and a children's book. And public radio fans may know his work from its numerous appearances on This American Life.

But for 25 years — whether in print, on air, on screen or in comic-book form — he only wrote fiction.

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Music Interviews
5:10 pm
Sat June 13, 2015

Bridging The Decades: Leon Bridges' Soulful 'Coming Home'

Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat June 13, 2015 6:21 pm

Soul singer Leon Bridges is 25 years old, from Fort Worth, Texas — and he's about to blow up. The first tracks from his forthcoming debut album, Coming Home, started to sneak out a few months ago, and they've already become hits online. From the moment he went viral, people were quick to compare his sound and look that of to Sam Cooke.

But Bridges says he didn't find his way into music through Cooke — in fact, he only started listening to him around two years ago.

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Author Interviews
5:21 am
Sat June 13, 2015

Lawyer Argues That Virtual Trials Would Make Justice System More Fair

Lydia Thompson NPR

Originally published on Mon June 15, 2015 2:18 pm

The death of Kalief Browder shined more harsh light on the American justice system. Browder was held at New York's Rikers Island prison complex for three years after being accused of stealing a backpack at 16. He was never tried, much less convicted, but spent nearly two years in solitary confinement and was savaged by gangs. Browder was finally released with no charges in 2013, but suffered aftereffects from incarceration.

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StoryCorps
3:25 am
Fri June 12, 2015

This Teen Wanted To Die, But An Officer Told Him 'Don't Give Up'

Sean Fitzpatrick (right) with John Gately, at StoryCorps.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri June 12, 2015 10:34 am

Eleven years ago, Sean Fitzpatrick was a high school junior in Spokane, Wash. He had developed paranoid schizophrenia and was hearing voices — though he didn't tell anyone.

One morning, Fitzpatrick went to school with a gun and a plan: To barricade himself in a classroom, pretend he had hostages, and force police to kill him.

His plan didn't work, though at the end of the standoff he was shot in the face and still has difficulty speaking.

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Music Interviews
4:28 am
Thu June 11, 2015

Back To Baltimore And 'Back 2 Love' With R&B Singer Maysa

Maysa, whose new album Back 2 Love is out now, is a music industry veteran and a Baltimore native.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu June 11, 2015 11:30 am

Baltimore is struggling with record violence: Last month the murder rate hit a 40-year high. NPR has been talking about this problem with law enforcement officials and politicians — and now, it hands the microphone to one of the city's artists.

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Author Interviews
4:25 pm
Tue June 9, 2015

Napoleon In America: Not As Strange As It Sounds

Robert Siegel interviews Munro Price, author of Napoleon: End of Glory about napoleon's failed plan to relocate to America after the defeat at Waterloo.
Courtesy of OUP

Originally published on Wed June 10, 2015 10:25 am

Here's a preposterous idea: Napoleon Bonaparte, defeated at Waterloo, his 15-year run as dictator, conqueror and self-crowned emperor at an end, escapes to the United States. Well, as preposterous as that idea might sound, 200 years ago this month, Napoleon Bonaparte was thinking precisely that thought: Flee to America. How serious was he, and what would he have done if he'd become a Jersey boy? Munro Price is a professor of modern European history at Bradford University in England and the author of Napoleon: End of Glory.

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Intelligence Squared U.S.
12:21 pm
Tue June 9, 2015

Debate: Does The Equal Protection Clause Require States To License Same-Sex Marriage?

Samuel LaHoz Intelligence Squared U.S.

The Equal Protection Clause of the 14th Amendment provides: "No State shall ... deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws." But, in 1868, when the Equal Protection Clause was ratified, gay marriage was inconceivable.

Some states have legalized gay marriage, while others have not. But is this one of those things that democracy does not get to decide? Is this a thing that the Constitution removes from the democratic process? Does the Equal Protection Clause require that?

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Author Interviews
3:54 am
Tue June 9, 2015

If Jimmy Fallon Gets His Way, 'Your Baby's First Word Will Be Dada'

Fallon's new book has a daddy bee, dog, rabbit, cat and donkey (one of his personal favorites) all trying — and failing — to get their babies to say "dada."
Macmillan Children's Publishing Group

Originally published on Tue June 9, 2015 10:16 am

A lot of things seem to come easy for The Tonight Show's Jimmy Fallon: comedy, music, dancing. Fatherhood didn't. Fallon and his wife struggled with fertility issues for years before they had their two daughters. Now one is almost 2, the other is not yet 1 and both are the inspiration for Fallon's new children's book, Your Baby's First Word Will Be Dada.

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Michel Martin, Going There
3:31 am
Tue June 9, 2015

The #BlackLivesMatter Movement: Marches And Tweets For Healing

Desiree Griffiths of Miami holds up a sign reading "Black Lives Matter" during a protest over the deaths of Michael Brown and Eric Garner.
Lynne Sladky AP

Originally published on Tue June 9, 2015 2:02 pm

In 2013, after George Zimmerman was acquitted for killing 17-year-old Trayvon Martin, a young woman in California named Alicia Garza wrote an emotional Facebook post that ended with the words "Our Lives Matter, Black Lives Matter." Her friend, Patrisse Cullors, turned that into a hashtag.

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All Tech Considered
5:18 pm
Mon June 8, 2015

Online Health Searches Aren't Always Confidential

A researcher found that online medical searches may be seen by hidden parties, and the data sold for profit.
Stuart Kinlough Ikon Images/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 9, 2015 3:57 pm

In the privacy of a doctor's office, a patient can ask any question and have it be covered under doctor-patient confidentiality. But what happens when patients want to search possible symptoms of a disease or ailment online?

It's common to search for treatments for a migraine or stomach pain on WebMD, or a flu strain on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. But there's no way to know who else may be privy to that search information. So where do the data go when a patient presses enter?

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Music News
3:14 am
Mon June 8, 2015

Amid Violence In Baghdad, A Musician Creates A One-Man Vigil

Karim Wasfi, conductor of the Iraqi National Symphony Orchestra, at his home in Baghdad, has been playing his cello at the sites of explosive attacks in Baghdad.
Ahmed Qusay for NPR

Originally published on Mon June 8, 2015 11:29 am

The roar of a car bomb has been the prelude to Karim Wasfi's performances of late.

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Author Interviews
5:31 pm
Sun June 7, 2015

In Debut Novel, Air Force Officer Questions How We Honor Our Veterans

Lydia Thompson NPR

Originally published on Sun June 7, 2015 6:21 pm

Why do we honor combat veterans? In his new novel, Air Force officer Jesse Goolsby asks that question through the stories of three veterans, their experiences in war and their lives back at home.

I'd Walk with My Friends If I Could Find Them is grounded in the wars of the last 15 years, but Goolsby points out the action takes place as much in the private lives the men lead in America as it does on the battlefield.

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All Tech Considered
5:28 pm
Sun June 7, 2015

What Makes Algorithms Go Awry?

By clicking "Like" and commenting on Facebook posts, users signal the social network's algorithm that they care about something. That in turn helps influence what they see later. Algorithms like that happen all over the web — and the programs can reflect human biases.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed June 10, 2015 2:23 pm

Like it or not, much of what we encounter online is mediated by computer-run algorithms — complex formulas that help determine our Facebook feeds, Netflix recommendations, Spotify playlists or Google ads.

But algorithms, like humans, can make mistakes. Last month, users found the photo-sharing site Flickr's new image-recognition technology was labeling dark-skinned people as "apes" and auto-tagging photos of Nazi concentration camps as "jungle gym" and "sport."

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Code Switch
4:50 am
Sun June 7, 2015

As 'Orange' Season 3 Begins, We Still Don't Know Why Poussey's In Prison

"Just having people come up to me and tell me how much they appreciate and are affected by my character and by the show --€” I hope that somehow this can become my ministry," Wiley says.
Courtesy of Netflix

Originally published on Mon June 8, 2015 12:10 pm

In Orange Is the New Black, Poussey Washington is a former military brat serving a six-year sentence in a minimum security women's prison. But even as the Netflix show enters its third season, Samira Wiley, who plays Poussey, has no idea why her character is incarcerated.

"Being honest and being truthful, I have no idea why Poussey is in prison," she admits to NPR's Rachel Martin.

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Music
4:47 am
Sun June 7, 2015

Kate Tempest: 'When You're Writing, It's Not About You'

"When I was writing or performing, it felt like a storm was breaking, like something very elemental and forceful was happening," Kate Tempest says, explaining her chosen stage name.
India Cranks Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon June 8, 2015 10:00 am

Kate Tempest is a woman of words. The English rapper, poet, playwright and novelist keeps language — and the stories that language brings to life — at the core of everything she does. Her subjects are everyday people: their hardships and failures, their loves and losses.

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Jazz
5:18 pm
Sat June 6, 2015

The Beat-Man Behind 'Birdman'

Antonio Sanchez is well known to jazz fans, but the drummer and bandleader got a boost when director Alejandro González Iñárritu chose him to compose a percussion-only score for the film Birdman.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat June 6, 2015 6:40 pm

Antonio Sanchez is one of the most accomplished and in-demand drummers around, and right now he's experiencing a breakthrough. Jazz heads have known him for years, but he reached a much wider audience last year with his score for the film Birdman.

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Author Interviews
5:18 pm
Sat June 6, 2015

'Balm' Looks At Civil War After The Battles, Outside The South

Courtesy of Amistad

Originally published on Mon June 8, 2015 1:22 pm

Dolen Perkins-Valdez wants to change readers' perspective on the Civil War. Her best-selling debut novel, Wench, explored the lives of slave women — not on Southern plantations, but in a resort for slaveowners' mistresses in Ohio. Her new book, Balm, is set in the postwar period, and it's also in an unexpected place: Chicago.

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U.S.
5:19 am
Sat June 6, 2015

Behind The Camera: How 'Vanity Fair' Got Its 'Call Me Caitlyn' Cover

Vanity Fair's Twitter page shows its July cover with Caitlyn Jenner. The issue and photo shoot had to be planned in secret.
Mladen Antonov AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 8, 2015 6:31 pm

Many people may not have read the article but millions of people have seen the cover photo for "Call Me Caitlyn," next month's issue of Vanity Fair, which introduces Caitlyn Jenner to the world. She is the Olympic gold medal winner formerly known as Bruce.

But what was the process of getting the cover done? And how did Vanity Fair keep it a secret? Graydon Carter, editor-in-chief of the magazine, joined Scott Simon from his office in New York. What follows are highlights of their conversation, edited for clarity and space.

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Code Switch
3:44 am
Fri June 5, 2015

Former Baltimore Mayor: City Must Confront The 'Rot Beneath The Glitter'

Kurt Schmoke, former mayor of Baltimore, is now the president of the University of Baltimore.
Courtesy of the University of Baltimore

Originally published on Fri June 5, 2015 7:58 am

It's the end of a tough week in Baltimore. Tensions continue in the Freddie Gray case. And now the murder rate has spiked to a 40-year high. One man who understands well what the city is going through is Kurt Schmoke. He's a native son and was elected as Baltimore's first black mayor in 1987. He served three terms, grappling with high unemployment, poor schools and violent crime.

Now the president of the University of Baltimore, Schmoke shares his memories of the city and his thoughts about moving it forward with Morning Edition.

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