All Things Considered on The News And Ideas Network

Weekdays, 4pm - 7pm; Weekends, 5pm - 6pm
Hosted By: Melissa Block, Michele Norris, Robert Siegel

For two hours every weekday, All Things Considered hosts Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block present this NPR program's trademark mix of news, interviews, commentaries, reviews and offbeat features.

Local Host(s): 
George Olsen golsen@publicradioeast.org
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Arts & Life
5:10 pm
Sat August 10, 2013

Audio As Art At New York Exhibit

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 1:26 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF ARPEGGIO)

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

Arpeggios ricochet through three speakers and envelop us. We're on the modernist Bauhaus staircase at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, listening to techno-inspired electronica. This piece is part of a new exhibit, "Soundings: A Contemporary Score," that opens today.

BARBARA LONDON: I wanted work that pushed limits, pushed boundaries.

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Technology
5:10 pm
Sat August 10, 2013

Technology's Role In Romance Dates To The Telegraph

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 1:26 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "CATFISH")

NEV: A couple of years ago, I fell in love online. Turns out my crush wasn't who I thought she was. I was heartbroken.

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

The MTV show "Catfish" looks into the anonymous world of online dating. It's a phenomenon in the news this year.

(SOUNDBITE OF NEWS SHOW)

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #1: Straight ahead, navigating the world of online dating. How to avoid getting hooked through a hoax.

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The Salt
6:05 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

Did Tyson Ban Doping Cows With Zilmax To Boost Foreign Sales?

A pen at a feedlot in central Kansas that houses 30,000 cattle. Feedlots are where cattle are "finished" before slaughter, often with the use of growth-promoting drugs like zilpaterol.
Peggy Lowe Harvest Public Media

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 6:36 pm

Tyson Foods Inc. announced this week that it would soon suspend purchases of cattle that had been treated with a controversial drug, citing animal welfare concerns.

But many in the industry wonder if the real reason is the battle for sales in other countries, where certain drugs that make livestock grow faster are banned.

"I really do think this is more of a marketing ploy from Tyson to raise some awareness so they can garner some export business from our overseas export partners," says Dan Norcini, an independent commodities broker.

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Iraq
4:24 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

July Was Iraq's Deadliest Month In Five Years

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 5:45 pm

Melissa Block talks to Tim Arango, Baghdad bureau chief for The New York Times, about increasing violence in Iraq.

Africa
4:24 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

As Ramadan Winds Down, Tensions Ramp Up In Egypt

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 5:45 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. In Egypt, the country's Muslims are marking the end of the holy month of Ramadan, celebrating with family and friends. But not everyone is home enjoying the holiday. Tens of thousands of protesters are still in the streets mainly camped out in two locations in Cairo.

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Code Switch
4:24 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

From Wrong To Right: A U.S. Apology For Japanese Internment

John Tateishi was incarcerated at Manzanar internment camp in California from age 3 until he was 6.
Chloe Coleman NPR

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 5:45 pm

This month marks the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, where the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. shared his dream for a more equal America. But there's another anniversary looming: 25 years ago this week, the Japanese-American community celebrated a landmark victory in its own struggle for civil rights.

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Remembrances
4:24 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

Jack Clement Worked With Some Of Country Music's Best

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 5:45 pm

We remember recording producer Cowboy Jack Clements, who died Thursday in Nashville at the age of 82. In the 1950s, he helped record Elvis, Carl Perkins and Roy Orbison when he worked at Sun Records in Memphis. He also discovered Jerry Lee Lewis and began a life-long friendship with Johnny Cash. Clement later provided the signature sound to one of Cash's biggest hits, "Ring of Fire."

Planet Money
2:42 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

The Raisin Outlaw Of Kerman, Calif.

Raisin farmer Marvin Horne stands in a field of grapevines planted next to his home.
Gary Kazanjian AP

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 9:39 pm

Meet Marvin Horne, raisin farmer. Horne has been farming raisins on a vineyard in Kerman, Calif., for decades. But a couple of years ago, he did something that made a lot of the other raisin farmers out here in California really angry. So angry that they hired a private investigator to spy on Horne and his wife, Laura. Agents from a detective agency spent hours sitting outside the Hornes' farm recording video of trucks entering and leaving the property.

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Parallels
12:36 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

Rome's New Mayor Wants The Monuments Pedestrian Friendly

Tightrope walker Andrea Loreni performs in front of the Coliseum in Rome on Saturday. Rome's new mayor is on a crusade to make the ancient monuments more pedestrian friendly, and the city held an all-night street party as it permanently blocked off part of the main road running past the Coliseum.
Gabriel Bouys AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 9:38 pm

On the first Saturday of August, a funny thing happened to 150,000 people on their way to the Roman Forum.

While a pianist and sax player set the mood, people looked upward and watched anxiously as acrobat Andrea Loreni made his way slowly on a tightrope stretched across Via dei Fori Imperiali, the wide avenue flanking the Forum and leading to the Coliseum.

The acrobat's walk was meant as a metaphor, a bridge reuniting ancient squares.

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Shots - Health News
7:04 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

Experimental Malaria Vaccine Shows Promise In Human Test

A red blood cell infected with malaria parasites (blue) sits next to normal cells (red).
NIAID Flickr.com

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 11:02 am

A viable, effective vaccine against malaria has long eluded scientists. Results from a preliminary study have ignited hope that a new type of vaccine could change that.

The experimental vaccine offered strong protection against malaria when given at high doses, scientists report Thursday in the journal Science.

The study was extremely small and short-term. And the candidate vaccine still has a long way to go before it could be used in the developing world.

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Politics
6:04 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

Can Congress Figure Out How To Rescue The Post Office?

U.S. Postal Service letter carrier Jamesa Euler delivers mail in the rain in Atlanta in February.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 6:56 pm

The U.S. Postal Service lost some $16 billion last year and continues to bleed red ink. Congress has been unable to agree on a rescue plan.

The latest proposal would allow the post office to end Saturday delivery in a year and enable it to ship wine and beer.

The Postal Service's woes are familiar: People don't really send letters anymore, so first-class mail is down, and Congress makes the post office prepay future retiree benefits to the tune of $5.5 billion a year.

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Energy
5:20 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

Fukushima Nuclear Plant Leaking 300 Tons Of Tainted Water Daily

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 6:56 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Education
5:20 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

Common Core Curriculum Brings Big Shifts To Math Instruction

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 6:56 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

To big changes now in the classroom. Most states have adopted new math and literacy guidelines for students from kindergarten through 12th grade. They're called the Common Core standards, and they rewrite the rules of what students should know grade by grade. When it comes to math, not only are the standards changing, some of the work kids will be doing and bringing home will actually look different.

To explain, here's NPR's Cory Turner.

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Television
5:20 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

Why Hasn't The Internet Blown Up Cable TV's Business Model?

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 6:56 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

Since Friday, CBS has been off the air for millions of Time Warner Cable customers. The two sides are fighting over how much Time Warner pays to carry CBS. Then a remarkable thing happened. Time Warner offered to unbundle the TV network, meaning only customers who want it would pay for it. That's close to blasphemy in the cable business and CBS quickly shot down the idea.

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Around the Nation
5:13 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

Laid To Rest: A Proper Burial For The Poor

In lieu of names, this headstone was engraved with a quote: "We grow afraid of what we might forget. We will find peace and value through community in knowing that we belong to each other. Dedicated to the Citizens of Bernalillo County."
Carrie Jung KUNM

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 6:56 pm

On a blisteringly hot summer afternoon, about 40 people gather at the Evangelico Cemetery in southwestern Albuquerque. Deacon Pablo Lefebre leads the service and begins with a prayer

"Because God has chosen to call our brothers and our sisters from this life to himself," he says, "we commit their bodies to the earth, its resting place. For we are dust, and to dust we shall return."

This isn't your average funeral. The light gray casket about to be lowered into the ground is filled with the cremated remains of 87 county residents.

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Asia
4:48 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

As Myanmar Opens Up, A Look Back On A 1988 Uprising

Democracy demonstrators wave the Burmese flag in August 1988, when millions of Burmese took to the streets. Students led the protests, but were soon joined by civil servants, police, soldiers and ordinary citizens.
Courtesy of Gaye Paterson

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 2:21 pm

Until two years ago, Myanmar, also known as Burma, was ruled by the longest-running military dictatorship in the world. In 2010, the military began to loosen its grip on the country, increasing civil freedoms and offering some political and economic opportunity for citizens.

But some are wondering whether the country can truly transition to democracy if it fails to reconcile with its brutal past.

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NPR's Backseat Book Club
4:03 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

'Dork Diaries' Reveal Secrets Of 'Not-So-Fabulous' Teen Life

Aladdin

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 7:13 pm

This month, NPR's Backseat Book Club goes snooping in Nikki Maxwell's "private and confidential" Dork Diaries. But the secret's already gotten out; the series launched four years ago, and there are already 12 million books in print in 34 different languages. The sixth in the series — Tales From a Not-So-Happy Heartbreaker — was just published in June.

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Found Recipes
3:51 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

Don't Let The Price Of Pine Nuts Keep You From Pesto

Julia della Croce says pistachio pesto is an economical — and delicious — alternative when Italian pine nuts can cost up to $120 per pound.
Nathan Hoyt Courtesy of Julia della Croce

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 5:10 pm

Basil is growing thick and leafy in many backyard gardens throughout the U.S. right now, which means many people are thinking about pesto. It's one of the more basic sauces you can make — in addition to basil, all you need is Parmesan or Romano cheese, a little garlic, some extra virgin olive oil and Italian pine nuts.

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Parallels
3:33 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

Egypt's Top General And His U.S. Lessons In Democracy

Downtown Cairo is plastered with huge posters of Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, the U.S.-trained Egyptian army chief who helped overthrow President Mohammed Morsi.
Amr Abdallah Dalsh Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 6:56 pm

Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, the man at the center of the military takeover in Egypt, is the latest in a series of American-trained foreign officers to oust a civilian government.

Just seven years ago, he was a student at the Army War College in rural Pennsylvania. At a recent military graduation ceremony in Alexandria, Egypt, el-Sissi talked about his ouster of Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi on July 3.

The army was forced to take that step, the general said, in the wake of mass protests against the elected government.

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Environment
5:48 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

EPA Wants To Allow Continued Wastewater Dumping In Wyoming

More than 40 years ago, the EPA banned oil companies from releasing wastewater into the environment, but made an exception for the arid West. If livestock and wildlife can use the water, companies can release it. Cows like these grazing near a stream of waste on the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming are supposedly the reason the EPA lets oil companies release their waste into the environment.
Elizabeth Shogren NPR

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 10:16 am

The Environmental Protection Agency is proposing to let oil companies continue to dump polluted wastewater on the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming. This includes chemicals that companies add to the wells during hydraulic fracturing, an engineering practice that makes wells produce more oil.

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