agriculture

The North Carolina Department of Agriculture is encouraging farmers to have their corn tested for aflatoxin to prevent contamination of feeds and food.  Jared Brumbaugh has more.

Aflatoxin is a byproduct of a mold, and can be harmful to both humans and livestock.  Feed Compliance Officer George Ferguson says the Cunningham Research Station in Kinston is one of six drop-off locations across the state where farmers can submit their 5 pound sample of shelled corn. 

NC Department of Public Safety

Halifax County’s Caledonia Correctional Institution continues to produce thousands of pounds of crops as the years go by. Lee Jenkins has more on the self- sufficient prison farm and the impact it’s had on the community.

Taking advantage of summer, men are planting, growing, harvesting and canning crops at Caledonia Correctional Institution in Halifax County.  This week on the Down East Journal, we hear about the prison’s agriculture program.  And, it’s an audio postcard from band camp.  The Down East Journal, Friday at noon on all of the PRE stations, and Saturday at noon on News and Ideas.

Tobacco Growers Association of North Carolina

Even though tobacco remains the number one cash crop in North Carolina, there's been a significant decrease in the amount of farmers growing tobacco in the past decade.  We'll explore the future of the state's tobacco industry.

An excessively wet and rainy June has damaged some crops in Eastern North Carolina. Lee Jenkins has more on the extent of the damage and what effect it may have on the consumer.

Despite what the Luke Bryan song says, rain isn’t always a good thing, especially when there is a lot of it. Typically, counties in Eastern North Carolina receive around four inches of rain during the month of June, but this year, most counties have received eight inches or more. National Weather Service meteorologist John Elardo says the coastal plain experienced the heaviest downpours.

We highlight a partnership between local farmers and the military aimed at buying locally grown food and producing energy from local biofuel crops.  

Agriculture and the military.  They both depend on undeveloped areas of eastern North Carolina to exist.

“Agriculture needs farms and open space, military needs farms and open space.”

This week on the Down East Journal, we highlight a partnership between local farmers and the military aimed at eating locally grown food- and producing energy from local biofuel crops.  And, we speak with the organizer of the Crystal Coast Music Festival about Saturday’s event on the Bogue Sound Waterfront in Morehead City.  Catch the Down East Journal, Friday at noon on all of the PRE stations.  And Saturday at noon on PRE, Public Radio East, News and Ideas.

  Tuscarora descendants from New York state and eastern North Carolina honored their ancestors at a recent ceremony in Snow Hill.  This week on the Down East Journal, we talk about the Battle of Nooherooka fought between settlers and the Tuscarora people in the 1700’s.  And, a great strawberry season is just around the corner.  We speak with growers in eastern North Carolina about a pesky virus  stunting some plants growth and how little impact the problem will have on yield.

Some say sparsley populated Hyde County is the perfect site to test unmanned aerial vehicles.   The county is in the process of submitting a proposal to be one of six FAA approved testing sites for drones.

We discuss the future of the biofuels industry in North Carolina. We talk to researchers and farmers about the potential of growing high energy grasses that can be converted into ethanol.