UNC Institute of Maine Sciences

UNC Institute of Marine Sciences

Black sea bass are making a comeback in North Carolina after the species was overfished a decade ago.  We visit the Institute of Marine Sciences in Morehead City where they’re using ear bones from hundreds of black sea bass to learn which habitats along our coast best support the fishery. 

E. Woodward/ UNC Institute of Marine Sciences.

The University of North Carolina’s Institute of Marine Sciences, East Carolina University and the Duke University Marine Lab are holding a workshop to bring K-12 teachers together with over 50 local marine and environmental scientists.  The third annual Scientific Research and Education Network event will provide educators with lesson plans on the most current research available.  SciREN is the brainchild of Ph.D candidates Justin Ridge and Ethan Theuerkauf.  Jared Brumbaugh spoke with both of them about the upcoming event.

The saying what goes around comes around is true for marine debris and plastics that end up in the coastal waters of North Carolina and eventually wash up on beaches or are ingested by fish, sea turtles and other aquatic animals.  A traveling exhibit makes a stop in Morehead City December 1st through the 4th to raise awareness of the impact marine debris has on wildlife.  Jared Brumbaugh speaks with professor at University of North Carolina's Institute of Marine Sciences Dr. Rachel Nobel about the exhibit and the featured artist.

This week on the Down East Journal, the results are in from the latest wild turkey observation survey.  We speak with wildlife biologist Chris Kreh about the annual report and about North Carolina’s rebounding turkey population.  And, we highlight a free event commemorating the 92nd anniversary of the Great Fire of New Bern in 1922.  The Down East Journal, Friday at noon on all of the PRE stations.  And Saturday at noon on News and Ideas. 

J. Crosswell, A. Joyner

Large bodies of water like the Pamlico Sound absorb carbon dioxide like a sponge.  But when a tropical storm or hurricane hits, it agitates the water releasing extensive amounts of CO2 into the air. We speak to a coastal scientist about the harmful effects of “burping estuaries.”  

Betsy Abare, UNC-CH Institute of Marine Sciences, Morehead City, NC

Tens of thousands of dead fish have washed up on the banks of the Neuse River.  Jared Brumbaugh has this. 

The fish kill at Flanner’s Beach started during the Labor Day weekend and was reported to the Neuse Riverkeeper Alliance Tuesday.  Travis Graves is the Lower Neuse Riverkeeper.

“100 percent of the fish I saw were on Flanner’s Beach were menhaden between the peanut size up to even the one year old and two year old.”

Large bodies of water like the Pamlico Sound absorb carbon dioxide like a sponge.  But when a tropical storm or hurricane hits, it agitates the water releasing extensive amounts of CO2 into the air.  This week on the Down East Journal, we speak to a coastal scientist about the harmful effects of “burping estuaries.”  And, we’ll talk about plans for a new children’s museum in Jacksonville.  The Down East Journal airs Friday at noon on all of the PRE stations.  And Saturday at noon on News and Ideas.

Stephen Fegley

Officials in North Topsail Beach called a special meeting just last week to address the loss of 900 feet of dunes.  It’s thought that winter storms and two hurricanes are the cause of erosion.  But there may be another contributor.  A team of researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Institute of Marine Sciences recently published results of a multi year study conducted in Onslow County that found sea level anomalies, or periods of higher-than-normal water levels, can cause extensive erosion.   This week, I spoke with Ph.

E. Woodward/UNC Institute of Marine Sciences

Research by a team of coastal scientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Institute of Marine Science is gaining national recognition.  The study looked at the rate at which oyster reefs grow and if they’ll be able to keep pace with rising sea levels.  After 10 years of study in coastal North Carolina, the results show that oyster reefs grow much faster than previously expected and can also be an effective way of slowing erosion.  Public Radio East's Jared Brumbaugh spoke with Dr.

NOAA

Local researchers embarked on a 10-day mission off the coast of North Carolina to map the ocean floor.  The new data may reveal areas where offshore wind energy development could occur with minimal impacts to sensitive fish habitats and ocean resources.

UNC Institute of Marine Sciences

On April 5th, the Beneath The Waves Film Festival takes place at the coast.  The festival includes a variety of films highlighting coastal issues, a panel discussion with local scientists, and booths showcasing marine science that happens in Carteret County.

UNC Institute of Marine Sciences

Coastal scientists are hoping to deploy two buoys in April to explore wind energy potential off the coast of North Carolina.  

This week on the Down East Journal, a workshop on February 20th aims to connect K-12 teachers with local environmental scientists to help students learn coastal biology lessons.  We visit a 3rd grade class at the Tiller School in Beaufort where scientists are teaching students about coastal ecology and food chains.  And, the North Carolina Symphony will make a stop in New Bern next week where they will perform one of the most powerful pieces of music ever written, Beethoven's 5th Symphony.