World

The Two-Way
1:43 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Pope Francis Is Now 'Papa Crow' To His Favorite Soccer Club

The San Lorenzo football club is very excited to have "Papa Crow" on its side.
Web image of San Lorenzo club's website
  • From 'Morning Edition': More about Pope Francis

Talk about having a powerful hincha on your side.

As the website of Buenos Aires soccer club San Lorenzo declares, the team now has "Papa Cuervo" (Papa Crow) among its card-carrying fans.

Read more
Asia
1:33 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

North Korea's Threats Grow More Ominous

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 2:38 pm

North Korea scrapped the 1953 armistice agreement that ended the Korean War, escalating fears of a preemptive nuclear attack on the U.S. Tuft University Korean studies professor Sung-Yoon Lee discusses this precarious moment for North Korea, its neighbors and the international community.

Law
1:33 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

'Cannibal Cop' Case: The Line Between Fantasy And Crime

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 2:38 pm

Jurors in a New York federal court found a former New York City police officer guilty of plotting to kidnap and cook his wife and other women. The defense argued that Gilberto Valle never acted on his fantasies, and described the verdict as a case of thought prosecution.

NPR Story
1:33 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

'Can't Buy Me Like': Advertising Strategy In The 'Relationship Era'

Social media allows consumers to drastically influence how businesses are perceived. Advertisers are no longer in control of the messages companies project.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 1:25 pm

Katie Fisher, a Progressive Insurance customer, was killed in a car accident in June 2010. Two years later, when her parents went to court to try to prove the other driver's negligence, Progressive stood against them.

Read more
The Salt
1:27 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Shanghai's Dead Pigs: Search For Answers Turns Up Denials

Villagers gather dead pigs in Jiaxing, in eastern China's Zhejiang province, on Wednesday. The number of dead pigs found in Shanghai's main river had doubled in two days to more than 6,000, the government said.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 10:08 pm

More than a week has passed since thousands of dead pigs were first discovered floating in a river in Shanghai, but authorities have yet to explain fully where the pigs came from or why they died.

Fourteen of the pigs had tags in their ears identifying them as coming from Jiaxing city, in neighboring Zhejiang province. Getting to the bottom of the pig story, though, is tough. A visit to Zhulin village, where most everyone raises pigs, was greeted by serial denials.

Read more
Ask Me Another
1:12 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Got Game

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 10:42 am

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Let's bring up our two brave contestants: Sid Solomon and Max Bernstein.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Welcome, Sid. Welcome, Max. So, Max, you are a PhD student in biology.

MAX BERNSTEIN: I am.

EISENBERG: I'm very impressed.

BERNSTEIN: Oh, thank you.

EISENBERG: What are you working on right now, may I ask? What's your project?

BERNSTEIN: I work on population genetics and evolution in microscopic worms.

EISENBERG: No idea what you're talking about, but that sounds crazy.

(LAUGHTER)

Read more
Ask Me Another
1:12 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Submit It In Reduplicate

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 10:42 am

Did you know Ke$ha's song "Tik Tok" demonstrates a linguistic oddity? And we're not talking about her spelling. "Reduplicated" words contain repeated syllables, but with different vowel sounds. Puzzle guru Art Chung leads contestants in a game full of reduplicated word pairs, so quit your "chit-chat" and listen in!

Plus, guest music duo Paul & Storm play an extra-special cover of "Splish-Splash."

Read more
Ask Me Another
1:12 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Jad Abumrad: Accidental Scientist

Jad Abumrad.
Marco Lau

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 11:01 am

  • Listen to Jad play "Accidental Science"
  • Listen To The Interview

Read more
Ask Me Another
1:12 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

For Your I's Only

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 10:42 am

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Finally, it's what our contestants have been waiting for. Let's bring back our winners to play our Ask Me One More final round.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: From Got Game, we have Max Bernstein. From Blinding Me With Science: Katie Hamill. From Submit It In Reduplicate: Matt Stefani. From Small Screen Adaptations: Brian Devinney. And from Long Before They Were Famous: Megan Schade.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Art Chung, what do you have in store for us?

Read more
Ask Me Another
1:12 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Small Screen Adaptations

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 10:42 am

TV shows are sometimes based on popular films, and while some are successful (Buffy The Vampire Slayer) others...not so much (Spaceballs: The Animated Series). Host Ophira Eisenberg has a few of her own ideas in this game, where players must "adapt" movie titles into shorter series versions by removing a letter to form a new, more succinct title.

Read more
Ask Me Another
1:12 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Blinded Me With Science

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 10:42 am

Guest troubadours Paul & Storm have emerged from their lab to share their latest experiment. To pay tribute to Thomas Dolby's 1982 New Wave classic "She Blinded Me With Science," the duo has reworked the lyrics to describe different scientific principles and discoveries. So put on your safety goggles and play along!

Read more
Ask Me Another
1:12 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Long Before They Were Famous

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 10:42 am

A long time ago, many people's surnames indicated their occupations. If your name was "Mason," you worked with stone, if your name was "Coleman," you worked with coal, and if your name was "Sanders," you ran a medieval chicken empire. Guest musicians Paul & Storm hint contestants to an occupational surname and a celebrity who bears it.

Read more
Ask Me Another
1:12 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Accidental Science

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 10:42 am

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Now, let's welcome back to the ASK ME ANOTHER hot seat, our VIP Jad Abumrad.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Jad, were you sweating it out backstage?

JAD ABUMRAD: Some of this stuff is abusively hard.

EISENBERG: Abusively hard. I don't think it's not...

ABUMRAD: No, no, it's fine. It's all good quizzical fun.

EISENBERG: Good quizzical fun.

ABUMRAD: Yes.

EISENBERG: You're ready.

ABUMRAD: I'm ready.

Read more
Shots - Health News
1:10 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Americans More Distracted Behind The Wheel Than Europeans

A woman uses a cellphone while driving in Los Angeles in 2011.
Damian Dovarganes AP

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 4:34 pm

U.S. drivers are much more likely than Europeans to drive while distracted, federal health officials report Thursday.

Nearly 69 percent of Americans who drive say that they talked on their cell phones while driving at least once in the previous month, according to a survey by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

That's a lot higher than what was reported by Europeans in another survey. Only 21 percent of British drivers reported chatting on their cell phones while behind the wheel, for example. In Germany and France it was about 40 percent.

Read more
It's All Politics
12:57 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Jeb Bush Opts Out Of CPAC Straw Poll

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush has asked that his name not be among a long list of potential 2016 Republican presidential candidates in this week's Conservative Political Action Conference straw poll.
Eric Gay AP

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 2:54 pm

Jeb Bush got headlines last week when he opened the door to a presidential run, after years of insisting he was not interested.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:36 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Jesuits Have Played Central Role In History Of The Church

Jesuit Mission in Santa Catalina in Cordoba in Argentina.
Luis Davilla Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 1:09 pm

Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio's ascendency to Pope Francis has suddenly placed his Jesuit order in the spotlight.

Francis' papacy is the first for a member of the Society of Jesus, which was founded in 1540 by the Spaniard St. Ignatius of Loyola and has grown to become the single-largest Catholic order, playing a central and occasionally controversial role within the church.

Today, some 20,000 Jesuits, about three-quarters of them priests, work in more than 100 countries and are best known for the schools and institutions of higher learning they administer.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:33 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Monarch Butterfy Population Falls To Record Low, Mexican Scientists Say

Monarch butterflies in December 2008 at the Sierra del Chincua sanctuary in Angangueo, in the Mexican state of Michoacan.
Mario Vazquez AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 2:47 pm

Monarch butterflies that once covered 50 square acres of forest during their summer layover in central Mexico now occupy fewer than 3 acres, according to the latest census.

The numbers of the orange-and-black butterflies have crashed in the two decades since scientists began making a rough count of them, according to Mexico's National Commission of Natural Protected Areas.

At a news conference Wednesday, the commission said the count was down 59 percent from December 2011 levels, when the insects filled 7.14 acres of fir trees in central Mexico.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:27 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Modern Parenthood: More Equal, More Stressed

Maybe in the 1940s, they just let them cry.
Fox Photos Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 1:50 pm

If you've ever had a spousal spat over who logs more time on housework, child care, or at the office, you might want to see how you stack up against other couples.

Read more
The Picture Show
12:23 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Taking A Look At Laos

Kongthaly works at Thanaleng station, the first and only railway station in Laos. He received his training in Thailand, as the Laos station adopted their operating system from Thailand railway.
Ore Huiying

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 4:20 pm

A diminutive, landlocked, communist country, Laos has a deserved reputation for being a quiet country in a dynamic region. But the rapid modernization in Southeast Asia is beginning to touch Laos as well.

A Chinese-funded trans-Asian rail is set to run right through Laos, connecting China's southern Yunnan province to Bangkok, Thailand. But some analysts say this is more likely to serve the countries it is connecting — largely China — rather than Laos.

Read more
Deceptive Cadence
12:16 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Marches Madness: Heralding The Pope

A marching band perfroms before the introduction of Pope Francis at St. Peter's Basilica on Wednesday in Vatican City.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 8:56 am

Read more

Pages