World

Shots - Health News
3:47 pm
Thu January 17, 2013

Anonymity In Genetic Research Can Be Fleeting

Each strand of DNA is written in a simple language composed of four letters: A, T, C and G. Your code is unique and could be used to find you.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 5:12 pm

People who volunteer for medical research usually expect to remain anonymous. That includes people who donate their DNA for use in genetic studies.

But now researchers have shown that in some cases, they can trace research subjects' DNA back to them with ease. And they say the risk of being identified from genetic information will only increase.

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Africa
3:17 pm
Thu January 17, 2013

Mali, Algeria Violence Stokes Fear Of New Terrorist Haven

A picture taken with a mobile phone earlier this month purportedly shows Islamist insurgents in Gao, Mali.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 4:04 pm

Hours after French troops launched a ground offensive in Mali to quash an Islamist rebellion, militants retaliated by seizing dozens of hostages, reportedly including Americans, in neighboring Algeria — an attack that underscores Western fears of a deteriorating security situation in northwestern Africa.

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Shots - Health News
3:14 pm
Thu January 17, 2013

Scientists Try To Thwart Flu Virus By Resetting Its Clock

When flu viruses (in red) accumulate an escape protein too quickly, they exit the cell nucleus (in blue) before they've made enough viral copies to spread the infection.
Benjamin tenOever

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 3:33 pm

Flu viruses can tell time. Sort of. And the viral clock-watching could provide a new way to fight the flu.

A study in Cell Reports describes how researchers tapped into the flu's internal clock as they search for ways to keep the virus from spreading.

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Monkey See
3:07 pm
Thu January 17, 2013

Dear Reader: Yes, There's A Reason People Asked Dear Abby For Advice

"Dear Abby" columnist Pauline Phillips, seen here in 2001, died Wednesday.
Reed Saxon AP

Dear Monkey See:

I just heard that Pauline Phillips, who wrote the advice column "Dear Abby," passed away yesterday at 94. From what I've read, she wrote or co-wrote the column for almost 50 years.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
2:51 pm
Thu January 17, 2013

Why Does Jared Diamond Make Anthropologists So Mad?

Diamond argues that there are things we can learn from small-scale societies like those found in Papua New Guinea.
Torsten Blackwood AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 7:54 am

Jared Diamond is once again inflaming my tribe.

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Books
2:14 pm
Thu January 17, 2013

The 'Underlying Logic' Behind The Madness Of The Office

In The Org, Tim Sullivan and Ray Fisman share case studies of organizations including McDonald's and Procter and Gamble.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 3:58 pm

Those of us who work in an office know that there is at least some part of the organization that is utterly frustrating.

In The Org: The Underlying Logic of the Office, authors Tim Sullivan and Ray Fisman argue that the back-to-back meetings and unending bureaucracy serve an important purpose.

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World
2:11 pm
Thu January 17, 2013

The Evolving Hostage Crisis In Algeria

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

And another story we've been following the past couple of days: Yesterday, an extremist group in Algeria attacked a remote natural gas production complex in the Sahara Desert and seized hostages, most of them Algerian, but including some Americans and other Westerners. Today, Algeria's military responded. Reports conflict on numbers. It seems clear some hostages have escaped, others have been killed.

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Books
2:04 pm
Thu January 17, 2013

Rereading The Classics: Lessons Learned The Second Time Around

When Kevin Smokler reread books he was assigned in high school, he saw them in a brand new light.
Zitona/Flickr

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 2:24 pm

Writer Kevin Smokler spent a good majority of 2012 rereading the books he was assigned back in his high school English classes. He called up some of his former teachers and put together a list of books to revisit.

He looks back at his 15-year-old self and sees a "pretentious," somewhat "idiotic" teenager who was able to pass his classes, but who really missed the themes at the heart of most of the books.

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The Two-Way
2:00 pm
Thu January 17, 2013

Up Next For Lance Armstrong: Post-Confession Court Cases

Lance Armstrong, right, faces several court cases tied to evidence that he cheated. One of the suits was filed by his former U.S. Postal Service teammate Floyd Landis. Here, the pair ride during the 2003 Tour de France.
Paolo Cocco AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 9:14 pm

Disgraced cyclist Lance Armstrong's confession to doping isn't just a matter of passing interest to sports fans, it has the potential to be pivotal new evidence in a raft of legal matters that have swirled around the cycling star for years.

Armstrong already has lost his battle with the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency, which detailed "the most sophisticated, professionalized and successful doping program" in sports when it announced a lifetime ban of the cyclist last October.

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The Two-Way
1:03 pm
Thu January 17, 2013

Calling Obamacare 'Facisim' Was 'Poor Choice Of Words,' Whole Foods CEO Says

John Mackey is co-CEO and co-founder of Whole Foods Market and co-founder of the nonprofit Conscious Capitalism, Inc.
Whole Foods Market Courtesy Harvard Business Review Press

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 3:06 pm

When The Salt posted Wednesday that Whole Foods CEO John Mackey told Morning Edition that President Obama's health care overhaul isn't socialism, it's "fascism," there was quite a response. The post has more than 500 comments, so far.

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Ask Me Another
12:10 pm
Thu January 17, 2013

Leverage Your A-Game

Originally published on Fri April 26, 2013 10:05 am

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Finally, it's what we've all been waiting for. Let's bring back the winners to play our Ask Me One More in final round. From Where in the World is Ronald McDonald, Reuben Hampton.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: From Celebrity Grammograms, Andy Kravis.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: For the Birds: Chris D'Orso.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Yes, Sir, Yes, Sir: Len Schiff.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: All Movies are the Same: Luke Green.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: All right, Will, take us out.

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Ask Me Another
12:10 pm
Thu January 17, 2013

All Movies Are The Same

Originally published on Fri April 26, 2013 10:05 am

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Moving on, here are our next two contestants: Luke Green and Jordan Shavarebi.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Luke, what is your favorite movie?

LUKE GREEN: Oh god, that's such a hard question. Probably "Die Hard."

EISENBERG: "Die Hard." Oh, I like your style.

(APPLAUSE)

GREEN: Or "Die Harder."

EISENBERG: Or "Die Harder." Oh, I don't like your style. Stick with "Die Hard."

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Okay, good. Jordan, what's your favorite movie?

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Ask Me Another
12:10 pm
Thu January 17, 2013

Sir, Yes, Sir!

Originally published on Fri April 26, 2013 10:05 am

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Let's get back to the puzzle mania with our next two contestants. Please welcome Danny Fox and Len Schiff.

(APPLAUSE)

LEN SCHIFF: Hello.

EISENBERG: Hello. Len, you're a lyricist that writes musicals.

SCHIFF: I am that, yes.

EISENBERG: What is your favorite musical?

SCHIFF: Oh, "Sweeney Todd."

EISENBERG: "Sweeney Todd" is a good answer. That is a good answer.

SCHIFF: Sundon Park.

EISENBERG: Yeah.

SCHIFF: It was even a clue last year.

(LAUGHTER)

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Ask Me Another
12:09 pm
Thu January 17, 2013

Celebrity Grammograms

Originally published on Fri April 26, 2013 10:05 am

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Let's bring up our next two fearless contestants. We have Andy Kravis and Sara Manaugh.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Andy, you're a bit of a geek. You parody pop songs with law school related lingo. What's up with that?

ANDY KRAVIS: That's right. I'm in the Columbia Law Review, which sounds just like the Columbia Law Review, the journal, except way better and a lot more fun. We write parody words to popular songs, and they have a law theme. And nobody finds them funny except for law students.

(LAUGHTER)

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Ask Me Another
12:09 pm
Thu January 17, 2013

For The Birds

Originally published on Fri April 26, 2013 10:05 am

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

All right, let's bring up our next two brave contestants: Jess Beck and Chris D'Orso.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Jess, you're a senior at BU, studying health science.

JESS BECK: Uh-huh.

EISENBERG: Do you know anything about birds?

BECK: A little bit.

EISENBERG: A little bit.

BECK: I'm not a bird scientist though.

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Ask Me Another
12:08 pm
Thu January 17, 2013

Where in the World Is Ronald McDonald?

Originally published on Fri April 26, 2013 10:05 am

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

In front of me right now are our first two contestants. Please welcome Reuben Hampton and Mark Thomas.

(APPLAUSE)

REUBEN HAMPTON: Hi, Ophira.

EISENBERG: Hello. Reuben, I have a question for you.

HAMPTON: What might that be?

EISENBERG: What is your favorite thing to order at McDonald's?

HAMPTON: Water.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Good answer, Reuben. I like the way you eat. Mark, what is your favorite thing to order?

MARK THOMAS: Absolutely nothing.

EISENBERG: Really?

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Shots - Health News
11:55 am
Thu January 17, 2013

After Years Of Silence, The Plague Can Rise Again

There's no doubt that the plague has staying power.

The deadly bacterium has probably been infecting people for 20,000 years. And, its genes have hardly changed since it killed nearly half of Europe's population during The Black Death.

Now microbiologists have evidence that strains of the plague may be able to reactivate themselves and trigger new outbreaks — even after lying dormant for decades.

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Music
11:44 am
Thu January 17, 2013

Emeli Sande Rocks Out With Michel Martin

Emeli Sande.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 10:35 pm

After huge critical and commercial success last year, breakthrough British sensation Emeli Sande has her sights set on America.

It's a long way from her roots. Born to a Zambian father and English mother, the singer-songwriter was raised in Scotland. She tells NPR's Michel Martin that being the only mixed-race family in a small village had a big impact on her.

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Monkey See
11:44 am
Thu January 17, 2013

Chicken With Gatorade: The Oddball Pleasures Of 'Chopped'

Ted Allen addresses the chefs competing on the Chopped Holiday Special.
David Lang Food Network

There's no shortage of food shows on television, from serene instructional content to tourist eye candy to kooky competitions where chefs cook in the desert. There's also The Great Food Truck Race, which is mostly about the finer points of where you should park a food truck.

But while my favorite was once Bravo's Top Chef, with its clearly skilled chefs and terrific judging panels, my new favorite is the Food Network competition Chopped.

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The Two-Way
11:04 am
Thu January 17, 2013

Top Stories: Hostage Crisis In Algeria; Gun Debate Continues

Good morning

Sorry we're late again with the roundup. We'll try to do better tomorrow.

Our early headlines:

-- In Algeria: Some Hostages May Have Escaped; Military Operation Launched

-- Manti Te'o: Story Attributed To Parents Hard To Reconcile With Hoax Report

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