World

Middle East
5:47 pm
Thu October 11, 2012

Turkey-Syria Tensions High After Plane Is Diverted

Originally published on Fri October 12, 2012 5:13 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

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Books News & Features
5:47 pm
Thu October 11, 2012

Nobel-Winning Chinese Writer Inspired By Faulkner

Originally published on Fri October 12, 2012 5:13 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel. This year's Nobel prize for literature was announced today. It went to Chinese writer Mo Yan. The Swedish academy praised what it called Mo's hallucinatory realism. As NPR's Neda Ulaby reports, Mo's work is also brutal, raunchy, funny and, unlike many Nobel literature laureates, relatively well known.

NEDA ULABY, BYLINE: Mo Yan is probably best known for writing what would become the movie "Red Sorghum."

(SOUNDBITE OF TRUMPET BLOWING)

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Art & Design
5:47 pm
Thu October 11, 2012

Satirical Art Brings Levity To London's Underground

Originally published on Fri October 12, 2012 5:13 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

There's a new guerilla art form in London. As Vicki Barker reports, it is intended to bring some levity to the Underground.

(SOUNDBITE OF LONDON UNDERGROUND TRAIN ANNOUNCEMENT)

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: The next station is Holborne. Change here for the Picadilly line.

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This Is NPR
5:36 pm
Thu October 11, 2012

Enter To Win A Free Tee: Test Your Knowledge Of NPR's Election 2012 Team

This could be you!
NPR

Originally published on Tue October 16, 2012 4:28 pm

For months, the NPR Election 2012 team has provided extensive reports and analyses of the 2012 race to the presidency. With hours to go before this evening's Vice Presidential debate, it's time to test your knowledge of the stellar journalists behind our election coverage and enter to win a FREE (and super cozy) NPR election tee.

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All Songs Considered Blog
5:07 pm
Thu October 11, 2012

First Watch: Astro, 'Colombo'

Astro.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri October 12, 2012 4:46 pm

Astro belongs to Chile's fantastic wave of modern musical exports, alongside rapper Ana Tijoux, pop singer Alex Andwandter and indie-folk singer Gepe, among others. Yet Astro stands apart from its contemporaries: Tijoux, Gepe and even Andwandter are inspired by Chile's folk tradition and serious social issues, while the band heads in a different direction with its fun, irreverent lyrics and synth-heavy sound.

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Movie Reviews
5:03 pm
Thu October 11, 2012

A 'Big Picture' Intently Focused On The Details

Paul (Romain Duris), an aspiring photographer, assumes another man's identity to escape his job, marriage and dull life.
MPI Media Group

The original French title of The Big Picture — an adaptation of a novel by American expatriate writer Douglas Kennedy — means "the man who wanted to live his life." That's pointedly ironic, since this existential thriller is about a person who seeks personal freedom by becoming somebody else.

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Movie Reviews
5:03 pm
Thu October 11, 2012

A Hollywood Noir Starring 'Seven Psychopaths' (Or So)

Crazy Funny: Seven Psychopaths centers on Marty (Colin Farrell), Hans (Christopher Walken) and Billy (Sam Rockwell), three Tinseltown oddballs with a sideline in dognapping.
CBS Films

If you do the math, the number of true psychopaths in Seven Psychopaths may not quite add up. Perhaps writer-director Martin McDonagh didn't want to go overboard with the murderous crazies. As it is, he's peopled his whimsically brutal comic thriller with — to name just three — an Amish throat-slasher, a dynamite-packing Buddhist and a serial killer who's fond of white bunny rabbits. That's probably enough.

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Movie Reviews
5:03 pm
Thu October 11, 2012

Two Films, Two Takes On Living With Genocide

Simon and the Oaks serves as a rather too cozy consideration of Nazi sympathies in Sweden during the early years of World War II.
The Film Arcade

Simon and the Oaks, a handsomely upholstered Swedish drama about two troubled families trying to survive World War II, is based on a runaway best-selling novel by Marianne Fredriksson. The film was made with money from several Scandinavian countries once occupied by the Nazis, as well as from Germany itself. It won a truckload of Swedish Oscars, and in the accolades heaped upon the movie, the word "epic" is thrown around with abandon.

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Movie Reviews
5:03 pm
Thu October 11, 2012

Getting Merrily 'Smashed,' And Then Crashing

Kate and Charlie (Mary Elizabeth Winstead and Aaron Paul), a young married couple, stumble down Kate's path to sobriety.
Sony Pictures Classics

"Hi, I'm Kate, and I'm an alcoholic."

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Movie Reviews
5:03 pm
Thu October 11, 2012

Even A 'Photographic Memory' Can Be Unreliable

Hoping to better understand his 21-year-old son, filmmaker Ross McElwee journeys to the French town where he spent his own young adulthood as a wedding photographer's assistant.
St. Quay Films

Originally published on Thu October 25, 2012 10:52 am

Some might characterize what filmmaker Ross McElwee does as navel-gazing. But in the hands of this veteran documentarian, that which might be self-indulgent egomania from a lesser artist is often the stuff of quiet revelation.

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Movie Reviews
5:03 pm
Thu October 11, 2012

A Dud Of A Comedy, But At Least The Cast Is Explosive

Frank (Charlie Hunnam) and Bruce (Chris O'Dowd) are brothers who have taken sibling antagonism to extremes.
Variance Films/Gravitas Ventures

Beneath a bright blue, near-cloudless sky, a lone aluminum trailer sits amid the sagebrush, the flat amber earth and the forbidding heat of Death Valley. Oddly enough, the trailer's single inhabitant doesn't seem the hermit type: Frank (Charlie Hunnam) is young, well-dressed and extremely handsome, the kind of blond-haired and blue-eyed good-looking that usually comes with easy confidence and a modeling contract.

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The Two-Way
4:57 pm
Thu October 11, 2012

'Softball-Sized Eyeball' Washes Up In Florida; Can You I.D. It?

Quite a baby blue.
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 10:41 am

Tell us you can resist clicking on this headline from Florida's Sun Sentinel:

"Huge Eyeball From Unknown Creature Washes Ashore On Florida Beach."

It's big, it's blue and the newspaper says "among the possibilities being discussed are a giant squid, some other large fish or a whale or other large marine mammal."

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission has sent the eye off for study.

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Shots - Health Blog
4:51 pm
Thu October 11, 2012

Among Disciplined Nurse Aides, Criminal Records Turn Up

HHS found that 19 percent of nurse aides who'd been disciplined had a prior conviction that would have shown up on a background check.
Matt Rourke AP

There are two ways to look at results of a recent investigation of nursing homes by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Both are pretty disturbing.

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Music Interviews
4:21 pm
Thu October 11, 2012

Blake's Poems, Reborn As Bluesy Folk Tunes, Burn Bright

Martha Redbone's new album is The Garden of Love: Songs of William Blake.
Fabrice Trombert Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri October 12, 2012 5:13 pm

The words of the English poet William Blake still resonate 185 years after his death. Blake, who was also a painter and printmaker, wrote the famous lines, "Tyger! Tyger! burning bright / In the forests of the night."

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Shots - Health Blog
3:58 pm
Thu October 11, 2012

How Cellphones Helped Researchers Track Malaria In Kenya

More than 90 percent of Kenyans use mobile phones, giving scientists a powerful tool to track how diseases spread.
Simon Maina AFP/Getty Images

Cellphones are popping up all over in health care these days. They're monitoring our blood sugar, tracking the flu season and even mapping the junk food we eat at night.

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It's All Politics
3:34 pm
Thu October 11, 2012

How Ohio Could Swing The Election

A campaign charter flight carrying Republican vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan arrives in Ohio, which has seen nearly nonstop visits from the candidates in recent weeks.
Mary Altaffer AP

Originally published on Thu October 11, 2012 4:52 pm

Kentucky may be the site for tonight's debate between the vice presidential candidates, but the monster swing state of Ohio remains the focus of White House dreams for President Obama and Mitt Romney.

Both the incumbent and his challenger have been in and out of the state with increasing frequency; GOP vice presidential candidate Paul Ryan plans a trip to the Buckeye State on Friday, after his tangle with Vice President Joe Biden.

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The Two-Way
3:27 pm
Thu October 11, 2012

Panda Cub's Death Due To 'Lung And Liver Damage'

Mei Xiang at the National Zoo earlier today. Her cub died last month.
Rod Lamkey Jr. The Washington Times /Landov

The giant panda cub born at Washington's National Zoo did, as first suspected, die on Sept. 23 because of "lung and liver damage" stemming from problems with her development, zoo officials say.

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The Two-Way
3:18 pm
Thu October 11, 2012

Very Fancy: Scientists Detail A Diamond Encrusted Super-Earth

Illustration of the interior of 55 Cancri e — an extremely hot planet with a surface of mostly graphite surrounding a thick layer of diamond, below which is a layer of silicon-based minerals and a molten iron core at the center.
Haven Giguere via Yale University

Originally published on Thu October 11, 2012 6:39 pm

Scientists have discovered a world much fancier than our homely, little Earth.

New research that will published in the journal Astrophysical Journal Letters details a planet that is eight times heavier than Earth and with twice its radius. But instead of being covered in water and granite, it is encrusted in graphite and diamond.

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Asia
2:42 pm
Thu October 11, 2012

A Shooting Foreshadowed By Taliban Threats

Malala Yousafzai is treated in a hospital in Peshawar, Pakistan, after she was shot on Tuesday.
ISPR EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu October 11, 2012 4:00 pm

A 15-year-old Pakistani schoolgirl remains in critical condition after being shot in the head for defying the Taliban and championing the right of girls to go to school. Malala Yousafzai rose to prominence during the recent war in Pakistan's Swat Valley by writing a blog under a pen name. NPR's Philip Reeves reported on that war — and twice met Malala's father. Reeves sent this account of the tough world in which Malala spent her childhood.

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Monkey See
2:36 pm
Thu October 11, 2012

The Refreshingly Murky, Mysterious, Mist-Shrouded 'Sailor Twain'

Cover, Sailor Twain
Mark Siegel First Second Books

Mark Siegel's new graphic novel, Sailor Twain, is a dark, allusive, satisfyingly knotty work of fiction.

Siegel anchors his fantastical main story — that of a Hudson River steamboat captain who rescues and falls in love with a mermaid — in exacting historical detail and deft character work. But the book's secondary storylines roil with ideas darker than those immediately apparent in his central, high-concept fairy tale — ideas about social mores, literary culture and sexuality.

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