World

Europe
7:45 am
Sun September 30, 2012

Shocking Video Could Throw Georgian Election

Originally published on Sun September 30, 2012 8:04 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

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Afghanistan
7:45 am
Sun September 30, 2012

Insider Attacks Hinder Transition Out Of Afghanistan

Originally published on Sun September 30, 2012 8:04 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. The big headline out of the U.N. general assembly has been about the speech by the Israeli prime minister who warned of the dangers of a nuclear Iran. Other speakers didn't get nearly as much attention.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: The assembly will hear an address by his Excellency Hamid Karzai, president of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan.

MARTIN: Hamid Karzai's address made little news, despite highlighting efforts to bring the Taliban back into mainstream Afghan society.

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Author Interviews
7:45 am
Sun September 30, 2012

How Humans Are Facilitating More Disease 'Spillover'

Originally published on Sun September 30, 2012 8:04 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

About 10 years ago, doctors in southern China started seeing a lot of patients with signs of what looked like a new illness.

DAVID QUAMMEN: It's like a very, very bad flu that gets people coughing and wheezing and with lung blockage.

MARTIN: That's David Quammen. He's a science writer who writes about the emergence of human diseases in his new book, "Spillover."

QUAMMEN: It causes a throbbing headache and a high fever. And then in some cases, if I recall correctly, it begins to cause organ shutdown, as well.

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Author Interviews
6:20 am
Sun September 30, 2012

The 'Future' Of Movies? Critic Says It's Not So Bright

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun September 30, 2012 8:04 am

According to David Denby, 1979's Apocalypse Now came "out of a movie world so different from our own that sitting through it again is almost a masochistic experience."

The New Yorker film critic clearly loves movies, but in his new book, Do the Movies Have a Future?, he argues that complex films like Apocalypse Now are becoming more and more of a rarity. Denby joins NPR's Rachel Martin to discuss promising directors, what it means to be a film critic and the future of film.

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Author Interviews
6:19 am
Sun September 30, 2012

Inverting 'King Lear' In 'Goldberg Variations'

Scribner

Originally published on Sun September 30, 2012 8:04 am

Author Susan Isaacs has written 13 books; 12 of them have been best-sellers. The women who inhabit Isaacs' books are smart, sexy, a little snarky, and filled with some serious chutzpah.

The center of Isaacs' latest novel, Goldberg Variations, is no exception. Gloria Garrison owns a multimillion-dollar makeover business, and she is not exactly an easy lady to get along with.

Isaacs talks with NPR's Rachel Martin about writing strong women and growing up wanting to be a cowgirl.

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Movies
6:04 am
Sun September 30, 2012

'Looper' Director: Memory A Form Of Time Travel

Bruce Willis and Joseph Gordon-Levitt play different versions of the same character in the time-travel thriller Looper.
Alan Markfield Sony Pictures

Originally published on Sun September 30, 2012 8:04 am

Looper is a time traveling action flick set in the year 2044. Star Joseph Gordon-Levitt plays a paid assassin who makes the startling discovery that his next target is actually himself — an older version of himself from the future.

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Music Interviews
6:04 am
Sun September 30, 2012

Janis Martin, 'The Female Elvis,' Returns

A publicity photo of Janis Martin in the late 1950s or early '60s.
GAB Archive Redferns

Originally published on Sun September 30, 2012 9:28 am

Janis Martin was just a teenager from Virginia when she was christened "The Female Elvis." In the mid-1950s, she sold 750,000 copies of a song called "Will You, Willyum." She played the Grand Ole Opry, American Bandstand and The Tonight Show. But her fame was short-lived. Martin got married and had a baby, which didn't sit so well with the people managing her career. Her label dropped her, and she fell off the musical map.

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Presidential Race
6:03 am
Sun September 30, 2012

To Prep For Debates, Stand-Ins Take The Stage

Republican presidential candidate Sen. John McCain waits backstage before the presidential debate with Obama in 2008.
Scott Olson AP

Originally published on Sun September 30, 2012 5:59 pm

When President Obama and Gov. Mitt Romney stand on the debate stage this week, their campaign advisers and debate coaches want everything — from the stage lighting, to the audience, the room temperature and most importantly, their opponent — to feel very familiar.

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Latin America
6:02 am
Sun September 30, 2012

Venezuela's Young Voters Courted Heavily In Election

Supporters of opposition presidential candidate Henrique Capriles attend a campaign rally in Valencia, Venezuela, on Thursday. Capriles is running against President Hugo Chavez in the country's Oct. 7 election.
Rodrigo Abd AP

Originally published on Sun September 30, 2012 1:09 pm

Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez is running for re-election next Sunday. With some polls predicting a tight race, the youth vote in Venezuela is shaping up to be crucial.

That has both the populist president and his challenger working hard to appeal to younger voters who are worried about high crime and jobs — and who can remember no other president than Chavez.

Out on the campaign trail, Angie Rivas passes out fliers and organizes other young people as they canvass this gritty metropolis in a van belting out hip music.

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What's in a Song?
6:00 am
Sun September 30, 2012

'I've Been Everywhere' Turns 2 Hours Into 50 Years Of Pay

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun September 30, 2012 2:14 pm

The song "I've Been Everywhere" was a hit for a string of country stars: Hank Snow in 1962, later Lynn Anderson, then Asleep at the Wheel and Johnny Cash. An all-American classic, right? Think again.

It was actually an Australian who, 50 years ago, wrote the song while trying to come up with a new opener for his act.

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Afghanistan
5:20 am
Sun September 30, 2012

'Suspected Insider Attack' Reported In Afghanistan

Originally published on Sun September 30, 2012 10:46 am

Update 10:22 a.m. ET: Not Necessarily An Insider Attack

According to a ISAF statement, the attack that killed a NATO service member and a civilian contractor in Afghanistan on Saturday may not have been an insider attack, as originally reported.

In the statement, the International Security Assistance Force says:

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Presidential Race
7:02 pm
Sat September 29, 2012

Ohio County A Historic Predictor Of State's Vote

President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney both campaigned in the battleground state of Ohio this week.
AP

Originally published on Sat September 29, 2012 8:35 pm

President Obama and Republican rival Mitt Romney both barnstormed Ohio this week, holding rallies just miles apart in the state's northwest. Obama's event was smack in the middle of Wood County, with Romney's just north.

The county may have a population of only 125,000, but it has an outsized importance in presidential elections.

"Since 1960, [Wood County] has predicted every election except for one," says Wood County GOP Chairman Matt Reger. "I think that it is a microcosm of Ohio, which in some parts is a microcosm of the United States."

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Technology
5:31 pm
Sat September 29, 2012

QR Codes For Headstones Keep Dearly Departed Close

Lorie Miller holds the brass QR code for her grandmother's gravestone. Smartphone users who scan it will be directed to an online tribute.
Emma Lee Newsworks

Originally published on Sun September 30, 2012 7:02 am

Lorie Miller bends over her grandparents' grave in north Philadelphia. She holds a two-inch brass square she's going to attach next to the headstone's names and dates.

Printed onto that square is a QR code — that square digital bar code you can scan with a smartphone. Miller peels off the back of her square to expose the adhesive and pushes it into place. The headstone, which otherwise looks the same as many others around it, has just jumped into the modern age.

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Arts & Life
5:17 pm
Sat September 29, 2012

Three-Minute Fiction Round 9 Stories: 'Butterflies'

Nemanja Zivancevic iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sat September 29, 2012 7:05 pm

Round 9 of Three-Minute Fiction has closed and the judging process is now under way. Susan Stamberg reads an excerpt from one standout story, Butterflies, written by Jennifer Dupree. You can read the full story below along with other stories at www.npr.org/threeminutefiction.

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Remembrances
5:17 pm
Sat September 29, 2012

Publisher Who Transformed The 'New York Times' Dies

Former New York Times president and publisher Arthur Ochs Sulzberger, center, died on Saturday. He was 86.
Marty Lederhandler AP

Originally published on Sun September 30, 2012 2:52 pm

The quiet man who modernized The New York Times over more than three decades and stubbornly defended the press against government interference died early Saturday at his home in Long Island.

Former publisher and Times Company chairman Arthur O. Sulzberger Sr. had suffered from Parkinson's disease. He was 86.

Sulzberger's family had owned the Times since 1896, and he was named publisher when his brother-in-law, Orvil Dryfoos, died unexpectedly in 1963.

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Three-Minute Fiction
5:03 pm
Sat September 29, 2012

Butterflies

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu October 4, 2012 12:29 pm

He finishes knotting his American-flagged tie and steps back, assessing. The office has taken its toll — he looks older, more jowly, slackened. His hair is grayer than it was — four years? Seven years? — ago. Some days he thinks it's his father looking back at him and he waves, two-fingered.

His wife is in the kitchen, sipping a cup of coffee, the rest of the pot keeping warm. He crosses the room to pour himself a cup but stops midway, thinking of something else. "Is today my speech?"

Avis smiles. "It could be."

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Politics
5:02 pm
Sat September 29, 2012

What Winning The 'Catholic Vote' Means Today

Archbishop John J. Myers stands outside Cathedral Basilica of the Sacred Heart in Newark, N.J. The archbishop has urged followers to assess the presidential candidates for their views on abortion and gay marriage.
Mel Evans AP

Originally published on Sat September 29, 2012 7:05 pm

Since 1972, every single presidential candidate who has won the popular vote has also won the Catholic vote. But with Catholics making up one in every four voters, pinning down what exactly the Catholic vote is becomes tricky.

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Author Interviews
4:28 pm
Sat September 29, 2012

Actor Robby Benson Is 'Not Dead ... Yet!'

Originally published on Mon October 1, 2012 11:34 am

Robby Benson began his career at the age of 12, on the Broadway stage, and became a teen heartthrob in the '70s, starring in films such as Ode To Billy Joe, Ice Castles and One on One, which he co-wrote. He was also the voice behind the Beast in the 1991 Disney film, Beauty and the Beast.

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Europe
3:28 pm
Sat September 29, 2012

U.K.'s Simmering Class Tensions Roil Over "Plebe" Flap

British Cabinet Minister Andrew Mitchell is accused of denigrating a police officer during an altercation over his bicycle.
Dan Kitwood Getty Images Europe

Originally published on Sun September 30, 2012 1:21 pm

A political scandal in the United Kingdom involving a bicycle, a police officer and a bad-tempered Cabinet minister has laid bare lingering tensions over the British class system.

The controversy has provided ammunition to those who charge the Conservative Party-led government is out of touch with ordinary Britons.

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NPR Ombudsman
3:12 pm
Sat September 29, 2012

The Fog of War in Benghazi and Washington

John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 23, 2012 11:30 am

First I heard the distant explosion of bombs. Then the night sky over Tripoli lit up with a fiery criss-crossing of bullets and rockets from attacking American warplanes and Libyan anti-aircraft batteries. I stood in awe on my hotel balcony, trying to decipher the action, until the better part of valor told me to crawl under my bed. It was 1986, and to this day, I cannot tell you who fired what when.

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