World

Race
12:08 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Consequences When African-American Boys Are Seen As Older

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 12:44 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. We're going to spend the next part of the program talking about some new conversations people are having about the way we look and talk about kids, both boys and girls. In a few minutes, we'll dip into the debate over whether we should stop calling some girls bossy as Facebook executive Sheryl Sandberg suggests we should. She says it dampens girls' desire for leadership. We're going to have a variety of opinions about that.

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All Songs Considered
12:03 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Neil Young Wants You To Truly Hear Music

Neil Young in conversation with NPR's Bob Boilen.
A.J. Wilhelm for NPR

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 11:47 am

Neil Young wants you to truly hear the music you listen to. Over the years, the trend in audio has prioritized convenience over quality. Last week at SXSW, I had a conversation with Neil Young about an idea he has to change that trend. In this interview, he talks about Pono, the new audio player he's been helping develop. Just before the interview, I spent time listening to Pono. It's impressive.

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The Two-Way
11:59 am
Wed March 19, 2014

Air France Relatives Have Sad Bond With Malaysia Air Families

June 5, 2009: Relatives and friends pray for passengers of Air France Flight 447 at the Nossa Senhora do Carmo church in Rio de Janeiro. Those who lost loved ones in that flight are expressing their sympathy and concern for those waiting for word about Malaysia Airlines Flight 370.
Sergio Moraes Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 1:05 pm

As the search for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 and the 239 people on board has continued over the past 12 days, there have been many reminders about the fate of Air France Flight 447.

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The Two-Way
10:54 am
Wed March 19, 2014

Britain Plans New 12-Sided £1 Coin To Combat Counterfeiting

The new 12-sided coin billed as the most secure ever. It is scheduled to be introduced in 2017.
Royal Mint

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 12:20 pm

Hoping to foil counterfeiters, Britain's Royal Mint is planning to introduce a new £1 coin that's described as the most secure in the world.

As British Chancellor George Osborne explained to Parliament on Wednesday, "the £1 coin has become increasingly susceptible to forgery" — noting that 1 in 30 of the £1 coins currently in circulation are fakes. The BBC reports that an estimated 45 million forgeries are in circulation.

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Business
10:28 am
Wed March 19, 2014

Toyota, Justice Department Reach Settlement On Recall

The Justice Department announced Wednesday that it has reached a billion-dollar agreement with Toyota, settling a federal probe into the company's handling of a recall for faulty gas pedals.

All Songs Considered
10:27 am
Wed March 19, 2014

SXSW 2014 Wrap-Up: Our Favorite Discoveries And Memorable Moments

Clockwise from upper left: Vancouver Sleep Clinic, Ghost Of A Saber Tooth Tiger, Sylvan Esso, High As A Kite, Perfume Genius
Courtesy of the artists

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 2:55 pm

On this week's show, our hosts are joined by Stephen Thompson to discuss their favorite discoveries at SXSW. Everyone had such a swell time at the musical blitzkrieg that they came down with colds. Their respective illnesses cannot dampen the colorful and illuminating memories that they made at SXSW 2014.

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All Songs Considered
10:26 am
Wed March 19, 2014

Song Premiere: Merchandise, 'Figured Out'

Merchandise's new song "Figured Out" will appear on a special Record Store Day LP, along with music from Destruction Unit and Milk Music.
Timothy Saccenti Courtesy of the artist

DIY punk bands from around the country are getting a bit more attention these days, largely due to Twitter and Bandcamp, and one of the turning points was Merchandise's 2012 album, Children of Desire. The Tampa-based band was a revelation to a lot of different music lovers; instead of the DIY garage-band stereotype, Children of Desire sounded like The Smiths. (Granted, a rough-hewn version without Morrissey's way with words, but The Smiths nonetheless).

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
9:03 am
Wed March 19, 2014

Is That Another Wave Of Collapse Headed Our Way?

London's financial district, known as the Square Mile. Will it be one of the first dominoes to fall when society can no longer sustain itself?
Peter Macdiarmid Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 11:39 am

As we found out on Monday, the universe appears to be filled with the rippling remains of an early period of ultrafast expansion, a discovery that ushers a new era of observations that will take us right up to the beginning of time. (Also: read Adam's post.)

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Mountain Stage
9:03 am
Wed March 19, 2014

The Lost Brothers & Guggenheim Grotto On Mountain Stage

Guggeinheim Grotto perform on Mountain Stage in 2009.
Brian Blauser Mountain Stage

Originally published on Thu June 19, 2014 4:46 pm

The Lost Brothers — Oisin Leech and Mark McCausland — are Irishmen from musical families who met while working in Liverpool. The two began writing songs together in their spare time, and liked the results so much that they decided to form a singing duo. They relocated to Portland, Ore., and cut their first album with M. Ward and Bright Eyes producer Mike Coykendall. Since then The Lost Brothers have issued two more recordings, and their most recent, The Coming of the Night, was made in the Nashville studio of Brendan Benson of The Raconteurs.

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Parallels
8:56 am
Wed March 19, 2014

'Saint Death' Now Revered On Both Sides Of U.S.-Mexico Frontier

Claudia Rosales kneels in front of her home altar devoted to Santa Muerte, or Saint Death. Rosales put up a statue of the saint in the city that was taken down by the mayor of Matamoros.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 5:40 pm

The intrepid tourist who visits the market in the border city of Matamoros will find her between the onyx chess sets and Yucateca hammocks. She looks like a statue of the Grim Reaper dressed in a flowing gown. She is Santa Muerte, or Saint Death.

Originally revered as an underground folk saint in Mexico, her popularity has jumped the Rio Grande and spread to Mexican communities throughout the United States.

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The Two-Way
8:05 am
Wed March 19, 2014

Ukraine Says It's Preparing A Plan To Withdraw From Crimea

Armed men stood atop a chimney near Ukraine's naval headquarters in Sevastopol, Crimea, on Wednesday. They raised Russian flags after taking over much of the facility.
Vasily Fedosenko Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 8:25 pm

This post was last updated at 4:50 p.m.

A day after Russia claimed Crimea as its own, Ukraine's security chief said they were drawing up plans to withdraw troops and their families from the area.

The BBC reports Andriy Parubiy said during a press conference that Ukraine wanted to move the troops "quickly and efficiently" to mainland Ukraine and that they would also ask the United Nations to declare Crimea a demilitarized zone.

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Parallels
7:46 am
Wed March 19, 2014

Borderland: A Journey Along The Changing Frontier

Dob Cunningham (right) and his friend Larry Johnson stand on the edge of Cunningham's 800-acre ranch in Quemado, Texas, which touches the Rio Grande. On the other side, Mexico.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 5:42 pm

My colleagues and I drove 2,428 miles and remained in the same place.

We gathered a team, rented a car, checked the batteries in our recorders and cameras. We moved from the Gulf of Mexico to the Pacific Ocean. We crossed deserts, plains and mountains. But all the while, we were living in Borderland — zigzagging across the frontier between Mexico and the United States.

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NPR Story
7:42 am
Wed March 19, 2014

Remembering The Alamo With A Texas Historian

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 10:28 am

At The Alamo in San Antonio, Texas, historian Frank de la Teja explains how the dividing line between the United States and Mexico came to be drawn where it is.

The Two-Way
7:28 am
Wed March 19, 2014

Book News: Notorious TV Pitchman Kevin Trudeau Gets 10 Years In Prison

Author and infomercial pitchman Kevin Trudeau.
AP

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 10:36 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
7:18 am
Wed March 19, 2014

Missing Jet's Mysterious Turn May Have Been Plotted Early In Flight

The cockpit of a Boeing 777.
Paul J. Richards AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 9:29 am

Twelve days into the mystery of what happened to Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 and the 239 people on board, more clues seem to raise only more questions.

The latest news about the investigation and search for the plane includes:

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Wed March 19, 2014

The World's Smallest Time Machine Is Still Pretty Big

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 10:50 am

When it comes to anthologies, there are two kinds of readers: On the one hand, there are folks who hate them simply because they're not novels — because it's like having an entire table full of appetizers but never getting to the main course. On the other, wiser (and, no doubt, better looking) hand, there are those who say, "Sweet! A whole dinner of appetizers!" and then commence chewing their way gleefully through every word.

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Digital Life
5:49 am
Wed March 19, 2014

Brit Uses Shakespeare To Exact Revenge

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 10:28 am

Edd Joseph bought a game console online, but he never received it. So he took revenge by texting 37 full Shakespeare plays to the seller's phone. That's nearly 30,000 messages.

World
5:08 am
Wed March 19, 2014

Will Economic Sanctions Impact Russia?

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 1:13 pm

It's not easy for the U.S. to put effective sanctions on Russia. But even Russians need to use U.S. financial institutions, and you pressure a country by limiting access to dollars and world markets.

World
5:08 am
Wed March 19, 2014

Anger And Shock In Kiev Over Russia's Land Grab

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 10:28 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Now, Russia's actions are being celebrated in Crimea. Many people there are excited about the idea of joining Russia. The emotion is much more downtrodden in the capital, Kiev, where there's a feeling of loss setting in.

And here's Eleanor Beardsley is there.

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