World

The Salt
5:23 am
Sat November 23, 2013

Time To Mix Up The Manischewitz Turkey Brine For Thanksgivukkah

Manischewitz-brined turkey centers the Thanksgivukkah feast, surrounded by challah-apple stuffing, sweet potato bourbon noodle kugel, horseradish-spiked mashed potatoes, brussels sprouts with pastrami and pickled onions, and latkes with cranberry applesauce.
Macey J. Foronda for BuzzFeed

Originally published on Sat November 23, 2013 11:35 am

You may have heard that this Thursday isn't just Thanksgiving — it's also the holiday of Hanukkah. It's a once-in-a-lifetime convergence people are calling Thanksgivukkah. Which naturally raises two questions: How did this happen? And, more importantly, what do we cook for Thanksgivukkah dinner?

For more on the math of Thanksgivukkah, listen to my story on Weekend Edition. For more on the food, read on.

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Television
4:21 am
Sat November 23, 2013

Allons-y! Why We've Been Traveling With 'Doctor Who' For 50 Years

Jenna Coleman plays Clara, companion to Eleventh Doctor Matt Smith. The relationship between the Doctor and his companions is at the core of Doctor Who's long-lived appeal.
Adrian Rogers/BBC

Originally published on Sat November 23, 2013 11:18 am

This afternoon, millions of fez-wearing fans around the world will tune in to a very special episode of Doctor Who. The venerable British sci-fi series turns 50 today — though the time traveling alien Doctor himself is probably somewhere on the wrong side of 1,000.

From scrappy, low-budget beginnings (bubble-wrap monsters, anyone?), Doctor Who has become a global phenomenon. Only soap operas can match it for longevity and popularity. So what's the secret to the Doctor's appeal?

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The Salt
6:47 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

Ancient Wine Bar? Giant Jugs Of Vino Unearthed In 3,700-Year-Old Cellar

Graduate student Zach Dunseth carefully excavates wine jugs found in the ruins of a Canaanite palace that dates back to about 1700 B.C.
Eric H. Cline Courtesy of Eric H. Cline/George Washington University

Originally published on Tue November 26, 2013 4:06 pm

It looks like our ancestors from the Bronze Age were way bigger lushes than we had ever realized.

Archaeologists have discovered a personal wine cellar in a palace that dates back to 1700 B.C. It's the oldest cellar known, and the personal stash was massive.

More than 500 gallons of wine were once stored in a room connected to the palace, located in modern-day northern Israel, scientists said Friday at a conference in Baltimore. That's enough vino to fill 3,000 wine bottles — or a seven-person hot tub.

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NPR Story
4:24 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

Old Political Feud In Philippines Fuels Rage Over Typhoon Response

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 7:21 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

While international relief efforts in the Philippines are in high gear, efforts by the Philippine government have been hampered. There are bitter rivalries among the country's political clans. And two major political families - including that of the president - are sparring over the response to the disaster. NPR's Anthony Kuhn has that story.

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Asia
4:24 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

Two Weeks After Typhoon, Philippines Sees Signs Of Normal Life

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 7:21 pm

It's been two weeks since the typhoon devastated Tacloban city in the Philippines. Marine Brig. Gen. Paul Kennedy is in Tacloban overseeing U.S. military relief efforts in the Philippines, and he says the city is picking up the pieces, businesses are re-opening and he sees signs up hope in the residents. Kennedy gives Melissa Block an update on the state of affairs in the country.

Parallels
2:06 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

British Case Points To Hidden Nature Of Modern Slavery

A pedestrian walks along Lambeth Road in south London on Friday. Police have rescued three women from a home in the neighborhood. They were held hostage for some 30 years, according to authorities.
Andy Rain EPA/Landov

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 3:40 pm

We told you last month about a report that estimated that nearly 30 million people live in slavery worldwide.

That report by the Walk Free Foundation said that India has the most slaves (between 13.3 million and 14.7 million people), while Britain is among the countries with the fewest.

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Shots - Health News
1:30 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

Eye Makeup Used To Protect Children Can Poison Them Instead

A child wearing the traditional eyeliner kajal peeps from behind a door in Allahabad, India.
Rajesh Kumar Singh AP

Putting black makeup around a baby's eyes is a common tradition across India, Pakistan and Afghanistan. Some parents think the eyeliner protects the eyes or improves sight.

But two recent lead poisoning cases in New Mexico offer parents another reminder to be extra careful with cosmetics on children's faces.

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The Two-Way
1:28 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

Norway's Magnus Carlsen Is New Chess World Champion

Norway's Magnus Carlsen smiles at a news conference after clinching the FIDE World Chess Championship Friday in Chennai, India, on Friday.
Babu Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 7:21 pm

In Norway, it's "Christmas Eve, New Year's Eve, all of the great days" rolled into one: That's because 22-year-old Magnus Carlsen has beaten the defending champion, India's Viswanathan Anand, to be crowned chess world champion.

The world No. 1's victory Friday over Anand, the world No. 8 and an Indian fan favorite, came after 10 games in Chennai, India. Carlsen won three and drew seven, and earned the highest rating of all time with the 6.5-3.5 win.

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The Two-Way
12:38 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

Pakistani Who Helped Hunt Bin Laden Is Charged With Murder

Pakistani doctor Shakil Afridi, in 2010, who has faced legal troubles since he took DNA samples that helped prove Osama bin Laden was in Abbottabad.
Qazi Rauf AP

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 1:42 pm

Pakistani doctor Shakil Afridi, who assisted U.S. intelligence agents trying to zero in on Osama bin Laden, has been charged with murder in a case stemming from a patient's death.

Afridi's lawyer, Samiullah Afridi, said he was informed about the charges Friday, and that a trial is scheduled for next month, Reuters reports.

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Music Interviews
12:26 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

Esperanza Spalding: Guantanamo Doesn't Represent 'Our America'

Grammy Award-winner Esperanza Spalding in her video 'We Are America."
ESPLLC

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 3:24 pm

Grammy Award-winning musician Esperanza Spalding has a problem with using the phrase "protest song" to describe her new recording, "We Are America." The song, along with its accompanying music video, demands congressional action to close the detention center at Guantanamo Bay.

" 'Protest' doesn't seem accurate to me," she tells NPR's Celeste Headlee. "We weren't thinking of a 'protest' song, we're thinking of a 'let's get together and do something pro-active, creative and productive' song."

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NPR Story
12:02 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

Jazz Legend Sandoval: Music 'Keeps You Alive'

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 3:24 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

Now we take a moment to highlight and salute another artist. Jazz-great Arturo Sandoval received the Presidential Medal of Freedom this week from President Obama. Sandoval was born and raised in Cuba, where he was once jailed just for listening to jazz music. So he packed up his trumpet and moved to the United States. A country he says gave him the freedom to fill the air with his music. Here's what the president said about him at the ceremony.

(SOUNDBITE OF CEREMONY)

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NPR Story
12:02 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

Do Sanctions Really Work?

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 3:24 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, we visit the Barbershop and ask the guys to reflect on the 50th anniversary of JFK's assassination in Dallas. That's in just a few minutes.

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Code Switch
11:39 am
Fri November 22, 2013

If Twitter Existed In 1963: Follow Live Tweets From Nov. 22

Lady Bird Johnson (left), Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson, First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy and President John F. Kennedy sit during the Fort Worth Chamber of Commerce Breakfast at the Hotel Texas.
JFK Library

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 3:18 pm

If you've been on Twitter the past couple of days, you might have stumbled upon tweets from @TodayIn1963. Since June, NPR's Code Switch blog has compiled moments from 1963 — a pivotal year in U.S. history — and is tweeting them as they happened then. The news — and @TodayIn1963 — will spin and spin as bits of history unfold in "real-time."

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Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz
11:33 am
Fri November 22, 2013

Kenny Werner On Piano Jazz

Kenny Werner.
Richard Conde

Pianist, composer and author Kenny Werner is known for his 1996 book Effortless Mastery: Liberating the Master Musician Within, which has become a university textbook for improvising musicians and other artists. His album of original compositions, No Beginning No End -- a meditation on loss, death and renewal — was awarded a Guggenheim fellowship in 2010.

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The Protojournalist
11:13 am
Fri November 22, 2013

9 Good Things To Do With Human Hair

princess red Flickr

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 12:34 pm

Hair. On a head, it can dazzle. In a drain, it can revile — its repulsive potential right up there next to slime, bugs and vomit.

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The Protojournalist
11:13 am
Fri November 22, 2013

Project Xpat: Exploring The Expatriate Life

Expatriate Ernest Hemingway, 1923
National Archives, via Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 4:20 pm

Funny thing about being an American living away from America: It makes you think more about what it means to be an American.

But which is the dominant sentiment? Absence makes the heart grow fonder? Or out of sight, out of mind? The answer depends on a lot of variables.

Over the years, various people and projects have explored those variables: the mechanics and meanings of expatriation.

One of America's most notable expatriates, novelist Ernest Hemingway, examined the notion from many angles in the 1920s.

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TED Radio Hour
9:32 am
Fri November 22, 2013

Are There Any Universal Beliefs And Truths?

James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 3:23 pm

Part 5 of the TED Radio Hour episode Believers and Doubters.

About Devdutt Pattanaik's TEDTalk

Devdutt Pattanaik takes an eye-opening look at the myths of India and of the West — and shows how these fundamentally different sets of beliefs about God, death and heaven help us consistently misunderstand one another.

About Devdutt Pattanaik

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TED Radio Hour
9:32 am
Fri November 22, 2013

What Can Atheism Learn From Religion?

TED

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 3:23 pm

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Believers and Doubters.

About Alain de Botton's TEDTalk

What aspects of religion should atheists adopt? Alain de Botton suggests a "religion for atheists" that incorporates religious forms and traditions to satisfy our human need for connection, ritual and transcendence.

About Alain De Botton

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TED Radio Hour
9:32 am
Fri November 22, 2013

How Does A Person Go From Believer To Atheist?

"I felt so lucky to be Catholic and I loved the Catholic school and I loved the nuns ... then when it came to the belief part of it I was always a little bit skeptical" — Julia Sweeney
James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 3:23 pm

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Believers and Doubters.

About Julia Sweeney's TEDTalk

When two young Mormon missionaries knocked on performer Julia Sweeney's door one day, it puts Sweeney on a quest to completely rethink her own beliefs.

About Julia Sweeney

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TED Radio Hour
9:32 am
Fri November 22, 2013

Is Doubt Essential To Faith?

James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 3:10 pm

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Believers and Doubters.

About Lesley Hazleton's TEDTalk

Writer Lesley Hazleton calls for a new appreciation of doubt and questioning as the foundation of faith — and an end to fundamentalism of all kinds.

About Lesley Hazleton

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