World

NPR Story
11:37 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Congolese Rebels Put Down Arms, But Will Another Group Rise Up?

The Congolese rebel group M-23 is has been condemned for its years of brutal violence against civilians. But now, they've vowed to lay down their weapons. Guest host Celeste Headlee discusses the issue with NPR's Eastern Africa correspondent Gregory Warner.

Parallels
8:01 am
Thu November 7, 2013

World Headlines: Guarded Optimism As Iran, West Meet Again

EU High Representative for Foreign Affairs Catherine Ashton speaks with Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif before the start of two days of closed-door nuclear talks at the U.N. offices in Geneva, Switzerland, on Thursday.
Martial Trezzini EPA /LANDOV

Iran, Press TV

There's guarded optimism as the second round of talks between Iran and international powers over the Islamic republic's nuclear program got under way in Geneva.

Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif met for an hour with Catherine Ashton, the EU's foreign policy chief, ahead of Thursday's talks. A tweet from Ashton's spokesman Michael Mann described the meeting as "good."

Read more
The Two-Way
7:50 am
Thu November 7, 2013

CIA Pays AT&T For Data On International Calls, 'Times' Says

The seal of the CIA at the agency's headquarters in Virginia.
Greg E. Mathieson Sr. MAI/Landov

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 2:11 pm

News keeps breaking about the alleged electronic surveillance done by U.S. spy agencies. Thursday's exclusive comes from The New York Times:

Read more
Africa
5:07 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Feingold: Rare Piece Of Good News Comes Out Of Congo

In the Democratic Republic of Congo, leaders of the once-powerful rebel group M23 announced they are giving up their insurgency. Renee Montagne talks to the U.S. Special Envoy to Congo Russ Feingold about the hopeful signs that peace may come to the eastern part of the country after decades of war.

Middle East
4:48 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Suspicions Bog Down Talks On Iran's Nuclear Program

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 4:54 am

Negotiators from Iran and six world powers resume talks Thursday in Geneva on Iran's nuclear program. Iran's Supreme Leader says he's not optimistic, and U.S. officials say "no deal is better than a bad deal." Still, Iran's desire to get out from under crippling economic sanctions may drive progress forward despite the long odds.

NPR Story
4:43 am
Thu November 7, 2013

To Understand A Russian Fireball, Physicists Turn To YouTube

The largest fragment of the Chelyabinsk meteor punched a hole in the frozen surface of Lake Chebarkul. The 1,200-pound stone was recovered from the lake bed last month.
AP

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 1:26 pm

Nine months ago a 12,000-ton meteor exploded over Chelyabinsk, a Russian city with 1.1 million residents. Hundreds of personal videos captured the fireball's flight — and that means you can watch the spectacle from almost any vantage point on YouTube.

Read more
Parallels
3:00 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Camus' Stance On Algeria Still Stokes Debate In France

Algeria-born Albert Camus poses for a portrait in Paris following the announcement that he is being awarded the Nobel Prize for literature in 1957. Camus' views on his birthplace still stoke controversy.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 2:56 pm

A hundred years after his birth, French writer-philosopher Albert Camus is perhaps best-remembered for novels like The Stranger and The Plague, and for his philosophy of absurdism.

But it's another aspect of his intellectual body of work that's under scrutiny as France marks the Camus centennial: his views about his native Algeria.

Read more
Monkey See
2:57 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Shonda Rhimes Knows Where This 'Scandal' Will End

Kerry Washington plays Olivia Pope on Shonda Rhimes' political drama Scandal, one of TV's most talked-about broadcast shows.
Danny Feld ABC

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 12:37 pm

Shonda Rhimes says the Washington she's created for the political drama Scandal is a dark, amoral one — and "a little Shakespearean," in the way it's a place where big themes play out among powerful people who aren't afraid to make bold moves.

"In the world of the show, [our] America sees Washington as this fairy-tale-beautiful place, and everybody who works there is really helping keep that illusion alive," the series creator tells Morning Edition's Renee Montagne.

Read more
Ecstatic Voices
2:56 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Across America, Voices Rise To Reinvent India

Kanniks with the choir at St. Johns Unitarian Church in Cincinnati in 2004.
Courtesy of Kanniks Kannikeswaran

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 4:20 pm

When I visit Kanniks Kannikeswaran on a weekday evening, he is warming up his choir in the meeting room of a civic center in suburban Cincinnati.

"Breathe in the cosmic energy," he says to the choir. The response is a collective "Ommmmmm ..."

Read more
Music
2:03 am
Thu November 7, 2013

No Earbuds Allowed: 5 Songs For Commuting By Bicycle

NPR's soon-to-be London correspondent Ari Shapiro on his trusty steed.
Denise DeBelius NPR

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 11:49 am

Read more
Latin America
5:01 pm
Wed November 6, 2013

Brazilian Soccer Convention Canceled Amid Funding Foibles

Originally published on Wed November 6, 2013 6:21 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Rarely does canceling a conference cause so much anger, but the nixing of a major soccer convention in Brazil has the government and organizers pointing fingers at one another. Known as Soccerex, the conference was intended to bring clubs, sponsors and business leaders together before next year's World Cup in Rio de Janeiro.

NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro reports the cancellation has pushed them farther apart.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Welcome, 2014 to the country Brazil.

Read more
Middle East
5:01 pm
Wed November 6, 2013

Kerry Tries To Get Israeli-Palestinian Peace Talks Back On Track

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 12:21 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

The peace talks between Palestinian and Israeli officials appear to have hit their roughest patch since the process restarted last summer. Secretary of State John Kerry spent today in Jerusalem and Bethlehem.

As NPR's Emily Harris reports, Kerry met with leaders from both sides in an attempt to keep the talks on track.

Read more
The Two-Way
4:07 pm
Wed November 6, 2013

Another Election?! Relax, This One's To Name A Baby Panda

You can help select a name for the National Zoo's new panda cub.
Abby Wood Smithsonian's National Zoo

Originally published on Wed November 6, 2013 4:45 pm

Fresh off Tuesday's election, another is just around the corner: The National Zoo wants you to help name its new panda cub by casting a vote at Smithsonian.com.

You can vote online (no photo identification required and the balloting continues until Nov. 22).

At NPR, we always strive to ensure that our audience is informed of the candidates — even when they're names for pandas.

Read more
Parallels
1:37 pm
Wed November 6, 2013

The Vatican Reaches Out, A Cricket Match At A Time

A player from the Vatican's new cricket team of priests and seminarians returns a ball during a training session at the Mater Ecclesiae Catholic college in Rome last month. The Vatican officially declared its intention to defeat the Church of England — not in a theological re-match nearly 500 years after they split, but on the cricket pitch.
Alessandro Bianchi Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Wed November 6, 2013 6:21 pm

Some 500 years after England's King Henry VIII broke with the Roman Catholic Church, the Vatican is vowing to defeat the Church of England — not in the pews, but on the cricket pitch.

The Vatican has launched its own cricket club — a move aimed at forging ties with teams of other faiths.

Rome's Capannelle Cricket Club is hosting training matches that will lead to the creation of the Vatican team, the St. Peter's Cricket Club.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:38 pm
Wed November 6, 2013

Tests 'Moderately Support' Case That Arafat Was Poisoned

Oct. 29, 2004: Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat boards a helicopter in Ramallah, the West Bank, for the start of his journey to a hospital in France. He died 2 weeks later.
Scott Nelson Getty Images

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 12:21 pm

Swiss scientists report that tests on the remains of former Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat "moderately support" the theory that his 2004 death "was the consequence of poisoning with polonium-210."

Read more
Parallels
11:09 am
Wed November 6, 2013

World Headlines: Israel's Avigdor Lieberman Acquitted Of Fraud

Israel Haaretz

Israel's Foreign Ministser Avigdor Lieberman, one of the country's most prominent and polarizing political figures, was acquitted of fraud charges on Wednesday in a closely watched case.

Lieberman, who is known for his hard-line policies against the Palestinians and Arab countries, is now expected to return to the job from which he resigned a year ago while the case was working its way through the courts.

Read more
Parallels
10:28 am
Wed November 6, 2013

In Violent Hospitals, China's Doctors Can Become Patients

People wait in line at a counter for medical services at the Guanganmen Chinese medicine hospital in Beijing.
David Gray Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Wed November 6, 2013 8:45 pm

Several hundred doctors and nurses jammed the courtyard of the No. 1 People's Hospital in Wenling, a city with a population of about 1 million in Zhejiang province, a four-hour train ride south of Shanghai.

They wore surgical masks to hide their identities from the government and waved white signs that read, "Zero tolerance for violence."

"Doctors and nurses must be safe to take care of people's health!" video shows them chanting.

Read more
Monkey See
9:50 am
Wed November 6, 2013

Miss Universe's National Costume Show Raids International Feather Supply

This photo of Brenda Gonzalez, Miss Argentina, is my prototype national costume. If you grew up wanting to be Miss Universe, this is why. Feathers, metallic bustier: this is it.
Darren Decker Miss Universe Organization

Originally published on Wed November 6, 2013 10:33 am

Two years back, we noted that Miss USA's costume at the Miss Universe National Costume Show was a mashup of tradition and vulgarity: "like crossing the Delaware to go to Hooters."

Read more
Shots - Health News
9:17 am
Wed November 6, 2013

Administration Looks To Give Labor Unions Health Tax Relief

Union member Tom Stensberg holds a sign thanking Congress for the Affordable Care Act during a rally hosted by the AFL-CIO at the U.S. Capitol in May 2010.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Weeks after denying labor's request to give union members access to health law subsidies, the Obama administration is signaling it intends to exempt some union plans from one of the law's substantial taxes.

Read more
Europe
5:31 am
Wed November 6, 2013

Neo-Nazis In Germany Use Music To Attract Followers

Originally published on Wed November 6, 2013 4:28 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Given its dark history, Germany prohibits, in its constitution, Nazi glorification, and forbidden speech includes neo-Nazi songs. The government is tracking more than 180 right-wing bands, an underground scene they say helps recruit young people to extremist groups. But officials say censoring neo-Nazi music to protect young Germans is not as easy as it once was.

NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson has the story from Berlin.

Read more

Pages