World

First Reads
7:03 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Exclusive First Read: 'Bridget Jones: Mad About The Boy'

The Kobal Collection

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 12:38 pm

Sequels: 2, Tragic life events: 1, Daniel Cleaver guest appearances: several (v.v. good)

Yes, Bridgeteers, your favorite British flibbertigibbet is back — but this time, there's bit of a suprise: She's grown up, at least a little. Now 51 and a widow (the shocking death of Mark Darcy was revealed recently in The Sunday Times magazine), Bridget is struggling to take care of her two young children and still make time for her hot young boyfriend.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Austen Unvarnished: Q&A With Jo Baker, Author Of 'Longbourn'

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 3:21 pm

The world of Jane Austen — gracious country houses, empire-waist dresses, card parties and suppers and genteel raillery and a touch of social anxiety — is familiar literary ground. And no house is more familar and comforting than Longbourn, home to Elizabeth and Jane Bennet. But what goes on behind the scenes? Who irons those dresses and prepares those suppers?

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The Two-Way
6:54 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Libyan PM Freed After Being Held For Hours By Gunmen

Libyan's Prime Minister Ali Zeidan speaks to the media during a news conference in Rabat, Morocco, on Tuesday, two days before he was abducted.
Abdeljalil Bounhar AP

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 11:44 am

Libya's Prime Minister Ali Zeidan was abducted Thursday by gunmen reportedly affiliated with former rebels. Hours later, he was suddenly freed.

Government spokesman Mohammed Kaabar said Zeidan has been "set free" and was on his way to the office, according to the LANA news agency.

Update At 8:50 a.m. ET. Reuters, which originally reported that Zeidan had tweeted that he was fine after his release, has withdrawn the story, saying the Twitter account was fake.

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Parallels
6:44 am
Thu October 10, 2013

After Boat Tragedy, Calls For A Unified European Policy

A survivor of the shipwreck of migrants off the Italian island of Lampedusa looks out over the water Tuesday. The tragedy has bought fresh questions over the thousands of asylum-seekers who arrive in Europe by boat each year.
Tullio M. Puglia Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 12:21 pm

Top officials are calling for a change to the European Union's immigration policies after a boat filled with African migrants caught fire and sank off the coast of the Italian island of Lampedusa on Oct. 4, killing hundreds.

As NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports on Morning Edition, the accident shocked Europe.

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Europe
4:44 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Tragedy Prompts Calls For Change To EU Immigration Policies

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 8:32 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Countries in Europe have been struggling for some time to find a fair balance when it comes to immigration, and those efforts took on more urgency last week. A ship packed with African migrants sank off the coast of the Italian island of Lampedusa. Hundreds of people drowned, including children and pregnant women. NPR's Eleanor Beardsley begins her report with a reminder that this incident at sea was sadly, not anything new.

(SOUNDBITE OF VIDEO)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: Help, help. Don't move.

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Books News & Features
4:44 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Literary Establishment Fails To Acknowledge Certain Authors

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 7:39 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The Nobel Prize for Literature will be announced later this morning and Japanese writer Haruki Murakami is the frontrunner, at least according to the British betting agency Ladbrokes. Writers who get the Ladbrokes' blessing do sometimes end up winning.

But NPR's Lynn Neary has been thinking about writers whose Nobel odds are more like a-million-to-one.

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

When people win big awards - the Oscars, The Tonys, the Grammies - they always act surprised.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: Oh, my God.

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Middle East
4:44 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Aid Workers: Syrian Refugees Unable To Help Their Kids Cope

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 12:09 pm

For two and a half years, Syria has been at war with millions of civilians on the move. U.N. agencies tracking the exodus say about three quarters of the children forced to flee their homes are under the age of 11. A team of child psychologists in Amman, Jordan, make house calls to address the needs of families who do not live in refugee camps.

Middle East
4:44 am
Thu October 10, 2013

U.S. Delays Egyptian Aid Over Democracy Issue

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 7:39 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

When Egypt's democratically-elected president was ousted from power, there was a lot of speculation that the United States might cut off some, if not all, aid to that country. And now the Obama administration has told the interim government in Egypt that it's holding up hundreds of millions of dollars. The message from the United States boils down to this: No Apache helicopters until you can show you're getting back on a path to democracy. NPR's Michele Kelemen reports.

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Africa
4:44 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Kidnapped Libyan Prime Minister Freed By Captors

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 7:39 am

The Libya State News Agency has announced Prime Minister Ali Zeidan has been freed. Earlier it was reported that gunmen kidnapped him from a hotel in Tripoli where he resides. The abduction came amid anger among Libya's powerful Islamic militant groups over the U.S. special forces raid that seized a Libyan al-Qaida suspect.

Arts & Life
2:58 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Tina Brown's Must-Reads: On Heroism

Daily Beast Editor-in-Chief Tina Brown
Victoria Will The Daily Beast

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 7:39 am

Tina Brown, editor-in-chief of The Daily Beast, joins NPR's Steve Inskeep again for a recurring feature Morning Edition likes to call Word of Mouth. This month her suggestions are all about heroes — whether being heroic means doing something, or not doing something.

Revisiting Black Hawk Down

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Deceptive Cadence
2:54 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Verdi's Operas: A Vigorous Soundtrack To Human Nature

Giuseppe Verdi's operas have an uncanny ability to probe into our contemporary psyche.
Leemage Universal Images Group/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 4:09 pm

Two hundred years ago today, in a small northern Italian village, a couple named Verdi — tavern owners by trade — welcomed the birth of a baby boy who would later change the face of opera forever. And, whether we recognize it or not, on the bicentennial of his birth, Giuseppe Verdi is still vital.

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The Record
12:03 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Mala Rodriguez And The Women Of Latin Hip-Hop

Mala Rodriguez on stage at the Mulafest Festival in Madrid in June.
Pedro Armestre AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 7:39 am

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
7:24 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Step Into Science: Let's Abandon Nerdy Stereotypes

Scientists have been known to surf. Really.
iStockphoto.com

People often ask me why I decided to become a scientist, especially younger students uncertain of their career paths. What I see, and I am sure many colleagues will confirm this, is that most people don't have the foggiest idea what it means to be a scientist. (No, not you; obviously not you.) I'll venture a guess here that less than 5 percent of the United States' population can call up the names of three living American scientists. What can be done to change this?

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It's All Politics
7:13 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Shutdown Diary: Paul Ryan's Plan Gets Tea Party Pushback

Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., offered a path forward in the fiscal stalemate, but Tea Party hard-liners weren't impressed.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Are House Republicans still seeking Democratic concessions on the Affordable Care Act? Or have they switched their sights to even bigger targets: federal spending on entitlements like Medicare and Social Security?

The answer on Wednesday depended on which Republican you asked.

Paul Ryan's Pitch

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It's All Politics
7:04 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

What To Call The Most Powerful Central Banker In The World

President Obama's nominee to lead the Federal Reserve, Janet Yellen, stands in the State Dining Room of the White House on Wednesday. If Yellen's nomination is confirmed by the Senate, she'll be the first woman to head the Federal Reserve System.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 8:10 pm

Janet Yellen got the official nod from President Obama Wednesday afternoon for the Fed's top spot. If Yellen's nomination is confirmed by the Senate, she'll be the first woman to head the Federal Reserve System and the most powerful central banker in the world.

But since she would be the first woman to get the job, just what exactly would her title be? Chair? Chairman? Chairwoman?

Yellen would replace Ben Bernanke, whose official salutation is chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System.

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The Two-Way
6:36 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission Temporarily Closes

Homes sit next to the Exelon Bryon Nuclear Generating Stations in Bryon, Ill.
Jeff Haynes AFP/Getty Images

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission, which oversees the nation's one hundred nuclear reactors, has announced it will temporarily close its doors on Wednesday evening, due to the government shutdown. Safety operations will not be affected.

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The Two-Way
6:03 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Americans Prefer Hemorrhoids And Cockroaches To Congress

he U.S. Capitol is seen on November 19, 2011 in Washington, D.C.
Brendan Hoffman Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 1:26 pm

We've known for years that Congress — as a whole — is unpopular.

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The Salt
5:53 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Fish For Dinner? Here Are A Few Tips For Sea Life Lovers

A fishmonger tosses a just-purchased fresh salmon to a colleague behind the counter at the Pike Place Fish Market in Seattle.
Elaine Thompson AP

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 6:00 pm

If sustainability is a top priority when you're shopping at the fish counter, wild-caught seafood can be fraught with ethical complications.

One major reason why: bycatch, or the untargeted marine life captured accidentally by fishermen and, often, discarded dead in heaps. It's one of the most problematic aspects of industrial fishing.

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It's All Politics
5:53 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Obama Has A Tea Party Cousin — And He's Running For Senate

Sen. Pat Roberts, R-Kan., and other senators rush to the floor for a vote in July. Roberts faces a 2014 primary challenge from a distant relative of President Obama's.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 8:14 pm

Another member of the Obama family wants to come to Washington. But don't expect the president to campaign for him.

Milton Wolf, a distant cousin of President Obama's, announced Tuesday he will run for the U.S. Senate in Kansas, challenging three-term Sen. Pat Roberts in the Republican primary.

There's some political distance between Wolf and his cousin in the White House, to put it mildly.

An outspoken critic of the president's health care law, Wolf writes a conservative column for the Washington Times and has made several appearances on Fox News.

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Shots - Health News
5:52 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Why Scientists Held Back Details On A Unique Botulinum Toxin

The botulism toxin comes from Clostridium botulinum bacteria, seen here in a colorized micrograph.
James Cavallini Science Source

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 3:51 pm

Scientists have discovered the first new form of botulinum toxin in over 40 years, but they're taking the unusual step of keeping key details about it secret.

That's because botulinum toxin is one of the most poisonous substances known. It causes botulism, and the newly identified form of it can't be neutralized by any available treatment.

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