World

The Salt
2:19 pm
Fri September 27, 2013

Students Win Seed Money To Make Flour From Insects

MBA students from McGill University in Montreal are building a company to mass produce grasshoppers, seen here at a market in Oaxaca, Mexico.
William Neuheisel Flickr

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 4:55 pm

Mohammed Ashour has a big order to fill: By March 2014, he has to deliver 10 tons of grasshoppers to customers in Mexico.

He and four other MBA students at McGill University in Montreal have a plan to farm insects in poor countries and turn them into flour that can be used in everything from bread to corn tortillas. And on Monday, former President Bill Clinton handed them $1 million to make it happen.

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The Two-Way
2:03 pm
Fri September 27, 2013

Will Qatar's World Cup Games Be Played Over Workers' Bodies?

Will Qatar get a red card (a soccer official's way of signaling a player has been ejected) for labor practices at World Cup-related construction sites?
Alessandro Di Marco EPA/LANDOV

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 5:17 pm

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The Two-Way
1:45 pm
Fri September 27, 2013

Freighter Makes First-Of-Its-Kind Transit Of Northwest Passage

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 4:17 pm

A Danish shipping company announced Friday the first-ever voyage of a large commercial freighter through the Northwest Passage — a journey made possible by the disappearance of Arctic ice due to global warming.

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Parallels
12:47 pm
Fri September 27, 2013

Around The World, Notions Of Beauty Can Be A Real Beast

"Today society accepts the idea of improving one's image," says Dr. Ivo Pitanguy, Brazil's most famous plastic surgeon. Here a patient receives an injection of hyaluronic acid to plump up her lips at the Brazilian Society for Aesthetic Medicine in Rio de Janeiro in 2008.
Antonio Scorza AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 9:54 am

Chinese-American TV personality Julie Chen reveals she had plastic surgery to make her eyes look less "Asian" to advance her career. Korean women are getting surgeries for permanent smiles.

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Music
12:46 pm
Fri September 27, 2013

Les Paul: Inventor and Innovator

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow, broadcasting today from Madison, Wisconsin, with a question for our audience, Wisconsinites, Wisconsinians(ph), whatever you prefer.

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Song Travels
12:24 pm
Fri September 27, 2013

Johnny Mathis On 'Song Travels'

Johnny Mathis.
Jeff Dunas Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat September 28, 2013 4:57 am

Singer Johnny Mathis started out with a string of hits in the 1950s and quickly became a household name. A two-time inductee into the Grammy Hall of Fame, Mathis has one of the most popular albums of all time with Johnny's Greatest Hits, which spent almost 10 years on the Billboard Top Albums chart.

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Food
12:23 pm
Fri September 27, 2013

Food Fermentation: The Science of Sausage and Cheese

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. We're here at the Wisconsin Science Festival at the Institute for Discovery in Madison and talking about a trip to America's dairy land, of course. Inevitably you're going to talk about food and fermentation. In the form of Wisconsin, it's famous for fermentation, one of the oldest ways of preserving food. It's also a way to get really unique flavors.

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Research News
12:19 pm
Fri September 27, 2013

World's Largest Neutrino Telescope Buried in Antarctic Ice

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY, I'm Ira Flatow. We're broadcasting from the Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery in Madison, home this week of the Wisconsin Science Festival. Astronomers and astrophysicists have traditionally, for centuries, looked upwards to the sky to learn more about the universe. We've launched telescopes into space. We have sent probes beyond our solar system to study dark matter, colliding galaxies, how the planets formed.

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Environment
12:15 pm
Fri September 27, 2013

Saving Wild Places in the 'Anthropocene'

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

We've been talking about the Stone Age but now we're living in what some scientists are calling the anthropocene. Maybe you've never heard of that word. It's a time where everything on the planet is touched by humans in some way, whether it's directly, like clear cutting forests or suppressing fires, or indirectly by the effects of climate change. Is this, as the environmentalist Bill McKibben wrote, oh, 20 years ago, is this the end of nature?

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The Two-Way
12:12 pm
Fri September 27, 2013

Kenyan Mall Attack Update: 3 Who Were Suspects Are Released

Friends and relatives of Mbugua Mwangi and his fiancee Rosemary Wahito attended their funeral service Friday in Nairobi, Kenya. Mwangi, who was Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta's nephew, and Wahito died in the Westgate Mall attack.
Jerome Delay AP

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 1:27 pm

Here are some of the latest developments in the aftermath of last weekend's attack by terrorists on a shopping mall in Nairobi, Kenya:

-- Suspects. Kenyan police are now holding eight people, Interior Minister Joseph Ole Lenku told reporters Friday. "Three others were interrogated and released," he said, according to Reuters.

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Humans
12:11 pm
Fri September 27, 2013

Modern Humans Still Evolving, and Faster Than Ever

For those who think the forces of natural selection no longer apply to modern humans, paleoanthropologist John Hawks would urge you to reconsider. In recent times — that's 10 to 20 thousand years, for a paleoanthropologist — Hawks says we've picked up genetic variations in skin color, and other traits that allow us to break down starch and digest cheese.

Planet Money
12:10 pm
Fri September 27, 2013

The Most (And Least) Expensive Basic Cable Channels, In 1 Graph

Quoctrung Bui / NPR

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 1:21 pm

Here's how the cable business works: Cable companies pay monthly fees to media companies for every channel they carry as part of basic cable. And then, of course, they pass those fees onto you, the subscriber. As the chart below shows, those fees vary widely — from $5.54 per month per subscriber for ESPN, all the way down to $.05 per month per subscriber for CMT Pure Country. In other words, if you have cable, you're paying at least $5.54 per month for ESPN — even if you never watch it.

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Paperback Nonfiction Bestsellers
12:03 pm
Fri September 27, 2013

NPR Bestsellers: Paperback Nonfiction, Week Of September 26, 2013

Talking Heads star David Byrne celebrates the power of sound in How Music Works, arriving at No. 12.

Paperback Fiction Bestsellers
12:03 pm
Fri September 27, 2013

NPR Bestsellers: Paperback Fiction, Week Of September 26, 2013

Alice Munro's Dear Life, a collection of stories set in small-town Canada, appears at No. 13.

Hardcover Nonfiction Bestsellers
12:03 pm
Fri September 27, 2013

NPR Bestsellers: Hardcover Nonfiction, Week Of September 26, 2013

Simple Dreams cover
Courtesy of Simon and Schuster

Simple Dreams, a memoir from Grammy Award-winning singer Linda Ronstadt, debuts at No. 13.

Hardcover Fiction Bestsellers
12:03 pm
Fri September 27, 2013

NPR Bestsellers: Hardcover Fiction, Week Of September 26, 2013

A fraud investigator takes on a tech CEO in Bleeding Edge by Thomas Pynchon. It debuts at No. 1.

Concerts
11:15 am
Fri September 27, 2013

CANCELLED: Carnegie Hall Live: Opening Night Gala With The Philadelphia Orchestra

Joshua Bell is the violin soloist at the glittering opening night of Carnegie Hall's 2013-14 season.
courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 12:04 pm

Due to a strike by Carnegie Hall's stagehands, represented by IATSE/Local One (International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees), tonight's performance has been cancelled.



PROGRAM:

  • Tchaikovsky: Slavonic March, Op. 31
  • Saint-Saëns: Introduction and Rondo Capriccioso, Op. 28
  • Ravel: Tzigane
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Monkey See
11:08 am
Fri September 27, 2013

Pop Culture Happy Hour: Who Are You Calling A One-Hit Wonder?

Seen here in 2005: Ladies and gentlemen, The Click Five.
Brad Barket Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 11:53 am

  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

On this week's Pop Culture Happy Hour, we start by breaking down last weekend's very somber Emmy ceremony, from the repeated death announcements to the perplexing dance routines to a couple of welcome victories that put a more positive spin on the whole thing. Did the host impress? What about poor Shemar Moore? And who will defend interpretive dance?

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Alt.Latino
11:01 am
Fri September 27, 2013

5 Latin Songs, Engineered To Cheer You Up

Celia Cruz, the queen of salsa.
Courtesy of the artist.

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 3:53 pm

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The Two-Way
10:44 am
Fri September 27, 2013

VIDEO: Yankees Great Mariano Rivera Bids A Tearful Goodbye

New York Yankees relief pitcher Mariano Rivera tips his cap in the ninth inning of his final appearance in a baseball game at Yankee Stadium, against the Tampa Bay Rays on Thursday.
Kathy Willens ap

The announcers kept quiet, so we won't say much either.

There's video here of what it was like Thursday night at Yankee Stadium when pitcher Mariano Rivera, considered by most experts to be the greatest "closer" in Major League Baseball history, threw his final pitch before heading off into retirement. He shed several tears, as you'll see.

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