World

Planet Money
5:25 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Episode 453: What Causes What?

W.W. Norton & Company Inc.

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 5:51 pm

  • Listen to the Episode

What causes what? The human brain is programmed to answer this question constantly. This how we survive. What made that noise? Bear made that noise. What caused my hand to hurt? Fire caused my hand to hurt.

We are so eager to figure what causes what — that we often get it wrong. I wore my lucky hat to the game. My team won. Therefore, my lucky hat caused my team to win.

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Author Interviews
5:09 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Stumbling Into World War I, Like 'Sleepwalkers'

Harper

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 8:04 pm

One hundred years ago, European statesmen — emperors, prime ministers, diplomats, generals — were in the process of stumbling, or as Christopher Clark would say, "sleepwalking," into a gigantic war. The Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914 is Clark's history of Europe in the years leading up to World War I — a war that claimed 20 million lives, injured even more than that and destroyed three of the empires that fought it. Clark joins NPR's Robert Siegel to talk about the book.

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Movie Reviews
4:59 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

'At Any Price': What Cost A Win?

They might look like team players, but Dean (Zac Efron) and his ambitious father (Dennis Quaid) have markedly different goals for the future of their expanding family farm — and the people who run it.
Hooman Bahrani Sony Pictures Classics

Originally published on Thu April 25, 2013 5:29 pm

Like last year's fracking drama Promised Land, the new movie At Any Price is about farm people getting pushed around by corporations — except that there's no Matt Damon to rescue them, cleanse his soul and snag Rosemarie DeWitt in the bargain.

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The Two-Way
4:58 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Bill Gates' Handshake With South Korea's Park Sparks Debate

This handshake between South Korean President Park Geun-hye and Microsoft founder Bill Gates sparked debate over whether the American — who kept his left hand in his pocket — had been rude. Other photos clearly show Gates' hand in his pocket.0
Lee Jin-man AP

Microsoft founder Bill Gates met with South Korean President Park Geun-hye Monday, part of a visit to build business ties and boost nuclear energy plans. But it was the handshake they shared that created the biggest stir in Korean society, after Gates greeted Park with a smile — and his left hand jammed into his pants pocket.

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The Salt
4:32 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

When Cheeseburger = Walking, Will We Eat Less?

Would you like that burger with a side of exercise?
iStockphoto.com

Nutrition labeling has been required on packaged food since 1990, and the new federal food safety law will require calorie counts to be posted for restaurant food — all in an effort to get the American public to eat healthier.

But most studies on calorie count labels show they don't do much to nudge people toward better food choices. If I want that oh-so-delicious Chunky Monkey ice cream, knowing that a half-cup serving delivers 300 calories and 18 grams of fat isn't going to stop me.

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Strange News
4:16 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Help Wanted: Must Like Big Stones, Work Well With Druids

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 8:04 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Now, from the Help Wanted desk here at ALL THINGS CONSIDERED.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Manager wanted at Stonehenge: Must like big stones and work well with Druids.

CORNISH: OK, that's not the exact wording they used, but English Heritage - which runs Stonehenge and the other U.K. historic sites - is in fact looking for a general manager for the ancient site.

SIEGEL: They're also looking for a part-time solstice manager.

CORNISH: Right. The full-time gig pays almost pays almost $100,000 a year.

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Latin America
4:16 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Venezuela Deeply Divided After Chavez Death, Recent Election

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 8:04 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The death of Hugo Chavez, Venezuela's bombastic and charismatic president, has left that country sharply divided. His handpicked successor, Nicolas Maduro, took over. He won a snap election, which gave the ruling party six more years. But Maduro's victory was slim. Nearly half the country supported his opponent, and that creates instability in one of the world's great oil powers. NPR's Juan Forero reports from Caracas on the uncertainty about Venezuela's future.

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National Security
4:16 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Canada Case Raises Concern About Link Between Al-Qaida, Iran

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 8:04 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

A different terror plot was foiled yesterday in Canada. That's according to the Canadian government. Two men are in custody. They're accused of planning to derail a passenger train with explosives. Canadian authorities say the plot was supported by al-Qaida operatives in Iran. Iran denies that.

Is it credible; is there any formal relationship between Al-Qaida and Iran? It's a question that's been explored at least as far back as the 9/11 Commission.

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World
4:16 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Relatives Of Bombing Suspects Shocked By Attacks

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 8:04 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Now, to Dagestan in southern Russia. It's home to family members of the two Boston bombing suspects, including their parents, and they have been under siege by reporters in Dagestan. Today, the family cancelled a planned news conference, and it's now facing questions from the Russian security services. NPR's Corey Flintoff joins us from Dagestan. And, Corey, first of all, remind us why the parents are there and not in the U.S.

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Latin America
4:16 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Bolivia Tries To Regain Sea Access It Lost To Chile In 1904

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 8:04 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

Bolivia wants access to the Pacific Ocean, so it's taking Chile to court. The landlocked South American nation lost its coastline in a war back in the late 1800s. Now, Bolivia's foreign minister has arrived at The Hague where he and a delegation will present their case at the International Court of Justice. NPR's South America correspondent Lourdes Garcia-Navarro reports.

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The Two-Way
4:16 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Allan Arbus, Who Played Psychiatrist On TV's 'M.A.S.H.,' Dies At 95

Allan Arbus on the left, with fellow M.A.S.H. stars Loretta Swit, Mike Farrell, Burt Metcalfe, Alan Alda, Kellye Nakahara Wallet and Wayne Rogers at an awards ceremony in 2009.
Alberto E. Rodriguez Getty Images

Allan Arbus, best known for his recurring role as psychiatrist Sidney Freedman on the hit television comedy M.A.S.H., has died at age 95, his family says.

Arbus died Friday due to congestive heart failure, his daughter said in a statement. His second wife, Mariclare Costello Arbus, told Reuters that her husband "just got weaker and weaker and was at home with his daughter and me" when he passed away.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
4:11 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Noticing: How To Take A Walk In The Woods

Oli Scarff Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 5:41 pm

When was the last time you met someone who didn't tell you they were "crazy busy"? It seems like everyone these days is overwhelmed. From the endless tasks of maintaining home and family life to the ever-accelerating pressures of the endlessly troubled, endlessly competitive economy, it seems that all of us are running ragged.

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Piano Jazz With Jon Weber
4:07 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Allan Harris On Piano Jazz

Allan Harris.
Ayano Hisa Courtesy of the artist

On this episode of Piano Jazz With Jon Weber, velvet-voiced singer, guitarist and composer Allan Harris joins Weber for a set of standards and a few tunes from the Harris-penned musical, Cross That River.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

World
4:04 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Routine On U.S. Racetracks, Horse Doping Is Banned In Europe

French jockey Olivier Peslier celebrates a win at Longchamps racecourse near Paris in 2012. While many drugs can legally be used on horses in U.S. racing, they are barred in Europe.
Fred Dufour AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 8:30 pm

At the famous Hippodrome de Longchamp just outside of Paris this month, crowds came to cheer and bet on the sleek thoroughbreds that opened horse racing season by galloping down the verdant turf course.

Horse racing in Europe is different from the sport in the U.S., from the shape and surface of the track to race distances and the season itself. Another big difference is doping.

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The Salt
2:27 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Want To Forage In Your City? There's A Map For That

Falling Fruit tells you where you can pick peaches and other foods free for the taking around the world.
istockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed April 24, 2013 11:25 am

If you really love your peaches and want to shake a tree, there's a map to help you find one. That goes for veggies, nuts, berries and hundreds of other edible plant species, too.

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The Two-Way
2:14 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Suspect In Ricin Letters Is Released On Bond

An image from a video on a YouTube channel where Paul Kevin Curtis has posted clips of his performances — in this case, as Elvis.
YouTube.com

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 7:40 pm

Update at 6:02 p.m. ET. Charges Dropped:

Federal prosecutors have dropped charges against a Mississippi man they accused of sending ricin-laced letters to President Obama and two other public servants, according to a court order obtained by the AP.

"In a court order calling for the charges to be dismissed, prosecutors said the 'ongoing investigation has revealed new information' without providing any additional detail," Reuters reports.

Paul Kevin Curtis was released from custody earlier Tuesday.

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Middle East
2:02 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

How Chemical Weapons Could Change Strategy For Syria

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 9:51 am

Transcript

JENNIFER LUDDEN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Jennifer Ludden in Washington. Neal Conan is away. Accusations that the Syrian government has repeatedly used chemical weapons against its own people are piling up. First were British and French officials who say they have credible evidence. Today, an Israeli military official joined the chorus.

The U.S. says it's evaluating the allegations. The stakes are high. Last year the Obama administration said the use of chemical weapons would be a game-changer that could provoke a stronger U.S. response.

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Planet Money
1:31 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Has The Cupcake Bubble Finally Popped?

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 4:26 pm

Back in 2010, our own Jacob Goldstein called the cupcake craze a "bubble of historic proportions." He called it too early.

The following year, Crumbs Bake Shop went public, and Jacob began to doubt himself.

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Shots - Health News
1:24 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Recalls Of Dietary Supplements Highlight Mystery Ingredients

A selection of dietary supplements declared "tainted" by the FDA
FDA

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 1:25 pm

Just because an over-the-counter product is called a dietary supplement doesn't mean that it's harmless.

Quite a few supplements have been found to include hidden and potentially risky ingredients, including drugs.

A recent study published in JAMA Internal Medicine found 273 recalls of dietary supplements between 2004 and 2012 because they contained drugs that could cause "serious adverse health consequences or death."

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Krulwich Wonders...
1:23 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Oh The Horror! Famished Silly Putty Devours Innocent Magnets

Vimeo

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 6:11 pm

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