World

Animals
6:38 am
Tue August 20, 2013

Obamas Welcome New Puppy To The White House

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne with news of a new member of the First Family. Bo may be the first dog but he's no longer the only dog. He now has a sister - Sunny. She's just over a year old and, like Bo, she's a Portuguese water dog. She'll likely join Bo in some official duties like greeting kids at the annual Easter egg hunt. The White House blog says Sunny was born in Michigan. And we'll believe that, after we see the birth certificate. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Author Interviews
6:23 am
Tue August 20, 2013

'Southern League': Birmingham Barons Break Racial Divide

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 7:09 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Pro baseball hasn't done much to inspire lately, think doping. But here is a story that might restore your faith in the good of the game.

(APPLAUSE)

GREENE: In Alabama earlier this season, the Minor League Birmingham Barons welcomed back some veteran players from a seminal year in the team's and the city's history.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: And now, ladies and gentlemen, doing our first pitch tonight, our 1964 Barons.

Read more
Asia
5:13 am
Tue August 20, 2013

Pakistan's Former Leader Musharraf Charged In Bhutto's Death

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 5:55 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. A dramatic turn of events in Pakistan this morning where a court has indicted the country's former military ruler, Pervez Musharraf, in the murder of Benazir Bhutto. Bhutto was an internationally known name and a popular former prime minister of Pakistan who was making a political comeback in 2007 when she was assassinated at a campaign rally.

Read more
Business
5:13 am
Tue August 20, 2013

Money Flows Into Egypt, But Where Does It Come From?

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 6:46 am

The aid propping up both sides of Egypt's ongoing political crisis largely comes from regional rivals. Saudi Arabia leads the financial support of Egypt's military rulers. Qatar leads the support of the Muslim Brotherhood. Renee Montagne talks to Max Rodenbeck, Middle East correspondent for The Economist, about funding sources

Middle East
5:13 am
Tue August 20, 2013

Symbolic Developments Indicate Direction Egypt Is Headed

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 5:23 am

Egypt's military-backed rulers are pressing on in their crackdown against the Muslim Brotherhood. Authorities have arrested the group's spiritual leader. Since the security forces crackdown on Islamist protesters last week, nearly 1,000 people have been killed.

History
5:13 am
Tue August 20, 2013

English Debate What To Do With Richard III's Remains

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 6:49 am

More than 500 years after the Wars of the Roses, the English are again fighting over Richard the Third. Archaeologists from the University of Leicester last year unearthed his remains under a parking lot in the city. Leicester Cathedral has earmarked more than a million pounds to give him a proper burial. But not so fast say the people of York.

Movies
5:13 am
Tue August 20, 2013

Winona Ryder: With Smaller Roles, A Welcome Return From Exile

Winona Ryder in the 2010 thriller Black Swan
Niko Tavernise Fox Searchlight

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 3:23 pm

This summer, NPR has been looking at comebacks — from politicians reinventing themselves to the recovery of once-endangered species.

And there's a special place in comeback heaven for disgraced movie stars — like Winona Ryder, who more or less made everyone forget about her 2001 shoplifting arrest with her role in the movie Black Swan, where she played an aging ballerina in a jealous frenzy.

But then people root for Winona Ryder. Film critic Wesley Morris has, ever since the 1988 movie Beetlejuice, where she played the ultimate depressive goth chick.

Read more
Business
5:13 am
Tue August 20, 2013

British Firm Tries Out Virtual Receptionist

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 7:20 am

Shanice is about to start her job as the receptionist at a new local government office in London. She also happens to be a hologram. Officials say that at a cost of $19,000, she's much cheaper than a living and salaried alternative.

Business
5:13 am
Tue August 20, 2013

Rocky Road Predicted For Egypt's Stock Exchange

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 7:15 am

The Egyptian Exchange was shut down at the end of last week as protests and violence raged in Cairo and elsewhere. It re-opened on Sunday, but trading hours were shortened to give employees more time to get home before curfew. Many foreign investors reportedly pulled out of the exchange earlier this year.

Environment
2:57 am
Tue August 20, 2013

How Extreme Australian Rains Made Global Sea Levels Drop

Heavy rains in Australia in 2010 and 2011 flooded farmland and homes, like these in the Queensland state town of St. George, seen here on Feb. 7. 2011.
Sally Nicol Rigney AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 9:19 am

Global sea level has been rising as a result of global warming, but in 2010 and 2011, sea level actually fell by about a quarter of an inch.

Scientists now say they know why: It has to do with extreme weather in Australia.

The sea level drop coincided with some of the worst flooding in that continent's history. Dozens of people died and torrents washed away houses and cars, forcing thousands from their homes.

Read more
Music News
2:03 am
Tue August 20, 2013

How To Win That Music Competition? Send A Video

If someone like Lang Lang were starting out now, the energetic concert pianist could nail every piano competition without the judges ever hearing a note, according to a new study.
China Photos Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 5:13 am

Chia-Jung Tsay was something of a piano prodigy. By age 12, she was performing Mendelssohn in concert. At 16, she made her debut at Carnegie Hall. Soon, she was on her way to some of the best music schools in the country — Juilliard and the Peabody Conservatory. And she was throwing her hat in the ring for different competitions.

Read more
All Songs Considered
8:12 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

New Music: Nine Inch Nails, Earl Sweatshirt, Juana Molina, More

Clockwise from upper left: Juana Molina, Trent Reznor of Nine Inch Nails, Earl Sweatshirt, The Goldberg Sisters (Adam Goldberg)
Courtesy of the artists

Originally published on Thu November 14, 2013 10:38 am

All Songs Considered co-host Robin Hilton has been feeling a little dazed and confused lately, so host Bob Boilen gives him a "sonic hug" with a new song from the Austin, Texas rock band The Octopus Project. Robin follows with a surprising cut from the first new Nine Inch Nails album in five years. NPR's Sami Yenigun brings a healthy dose of dance beats from Seven Davis Jr.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:02 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

Guardian Editor: U.K. Govt. Destroyed Hard Drives With NSA Leaks

The offices of The Guardian and The Observer in London.
Peter Macdiarmid Getty Images

A day after journalist Glenn Greenwald's partner was detained by authorities at London Heathrow Airport, the editor of the British newspaper that employs Greenwald is making a bomb-shell allegation: Alan Rusbridger writes that the British spy agency raided the offices of the The Guardian and destroyed hard drives containing some of the classified information leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

Read more
Europe
6:37 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

Relying On Old Artisan Ways, French Brand Makes Itself Anew

Moynat was renowned for products such as the lightweight wicker trunk named Malle Anglaise, or English trunk, which was invented in 1873. This trunk was subsequently improved and a new patent filed in 1889.
Courtesy of Moynat

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 6:58 pm

Founded in the mid-19th century, French luxury leather goods maker Moynat became renowned for making traveling trunks for the moneyed set. Though a pioneer in its field, it fell on hard times and closed its doors in the 1970s.

These days, the fabled company is undergoing a resurrection — turning out limited quantities of luxurious, handmade bags that rely on centuries-old craftsmanship.

On a recent day, Moynat's CEO, Guillaume Davin, leads me up the back stairs of the company's flagship boutique in Paris.

Read more
The Two-Way
6:18 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

Calif. Wins Permission To Force-Feed Prison Hunger Strikers

Inmates at California's Chino State Prison in December 2010.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 3:58 am

This post was updated at 3:47 a.m. ET Tuesday:

The Associated Press reports: A federal judge approved Monday's request from California and federal officials to force-feed inmates if necessary as a statewide prison hunger strike entered its seventh week.

Read more
The Record
5:57 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

Albert Murray, Writer And Co-Founder Of Jazz At Lincoln Center, Dies

Writer, historian and critic Albert Murray in New York City in 2000.
Chris Felver Getty Images

Albert Murray, the influential writer and critic who helped found Jazz at Lincoln Center, died Sunday at home in Harlem. He was 97 years old. Duke Ellington once described him as the "unsquarest person I know."

For Murray, jazz and blues were more than just musical forms. They were a survival technique — an improvisatory response to hardship and uncertainty, as he told NPR in 1997: "You don't know how many bars you have, but however many of them you can make swing, the better off you are. That's about it."

Read more
Shots - Health News
5:52 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

Lyme Disease Far More Common Than Previously Known

Black-legged ticks like this can transmit the bacterium that causes Lyme disease.
CDC

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 6:58 pm

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says 300,000 Americans are getting Lyme disease every year, and the toll is growing.

"It confirms what we've thought for a long time: This is a large problem," Dr. Paul Mead tells Shots. "The bottom line is that by defining how big the problem is we make it easier for everyone to figure out what kind of resources we have to use to address it."

Read more
The Picture Show
5:23 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

Blurring The Border To See Two Sides

A framed picture of Lily Ramos with her two girls at her home in Bend, Ore. She left the picture and her kids — Brian, Ashley and Karleen — with a relative when she was deported to Mexico. "No quiero que sufren," she said. "I don't want them to suffer."
Dania Maxwell

Growing up in Santa Barbara, Calif., photojournalist Dania Maxwell saw two different sides of life.

"I grew up, I feel, with a lot of privilege," she says. "I was given a house, a home, a family that I love."

But her mother, an immigrant from Argentina, wanted to show her that there was "another side" to her hometown.

They would spend time at Latino community centers — and Maxwell's nanny was an illegal immigrant from El Salvador. Her mother, Maxwell says, "made me think critically about what was happening."

Read more
A Blog Supreme
5:16 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

Jazz Piano Giant Cedar Walton Dies At 79

Cedar Walton in 2008.
John Rogers for NPR johnrogersnyc.com

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 12:48 am

Cedar Walton, one of the top jazz pianists to emerge in the aftermath of bebop, died Monday morning at his home in Brooklyn, N.Y., according to his wife, Martha. Walton was 79.

Read more
NPR Story
5:13 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

Some Investors Choosing U.S. Over Emerging Markets

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 6:58 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

For a long time, investors aiming for city profits have maintained that the smart money was on emerging markets. Economic growth in Brazil, Russia, India and China, the BRIC countries as they're known, has outstripped opportunities in the U.S. But in recent months, there is evidence that trend is starting to change. NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports investors are turning back to markets in the U.S. and other developed economies.

Read more

Pages