World

It's All Politics
4:55 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

GOP Debate: Is Obamacare Fight Worth A Government Shutdown?

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 8:40 am

Congressional Republicans agree that the new federal health care program should be ended. But they are finding themselves bitterly divided over how.

They have tried dozens of times to repeal it. Now, some GOP lawmakers want to block all money for Obamacare in a stopgap spending bill that must be approved next month to prevent the government from shutting down on Oct. 1. But other Republicans say that won't work and may well backfire.

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NPR's Backseat Book Club
3:09 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

September Kids' Book Club Pick: 'Wonder'

Random House

When Madeleine L'Engle won the Newbery Prize for A Wrinkle in Time, she ended her speech with the thought that a book "can be a star, 'explosive material, capable of stirring up fresh life endlessly,' a living fire to lighten the darkness, leading out into the expanding universe."

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Shots - Health News
2:59 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Industry Ties Raise Questions About Expert Medical Panels

Who's deciding which boxes he gets to check?
iStockphoto.com

When your doctor is looking to make a diagnosis or choose a treatment, she often checks to see what the experts recommend.

Guidelines from these groups of leading doctors help the average physician decide if it's time to prescribe drugs to lower a patient's cholesterol or turn to medicines for someone's depression.

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The Two-Way
2:18 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

In Moscow, American Runner Dedicates His Medal To Gay Friends

Nick Symmonds of the United States celebrates winning silver in the Men's 800 meters final during Day Four of the 14th IAAF World Athletics Championships Moscow 2013 at Luzhniki Stadium on Tuesday.
Mark Kolbe Getty Images

The two-time U.S. Olympian Nick Symmonds won the silver medal in the 800 meter race, yesterday, in the IAAF World Athletics Championships in Moscow.

That wasn't the news, however. Instead, the news became Symmonds' dedication of his medal to his gay and lesbian friends.

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NPR Ombudsman
2:11 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

S. Dakota Indian Foster Care: Listening To Your Responses

The Pine Ridge Indian Reservation is home to the Oglala Sioux Tribe.
Kristi Eaton AP

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 4:55 pm

Updated Aug. 30, 2013 at 5 p.m.

One of the things that struck me most about the many responses to my review of an investigative series on foster care for Native Americans in South Dakota is that the ombudsman process worked.

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Law
1:50 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Past Immigration Policies Had A Reverse Effect, Professor Says

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 2:20 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

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Books
1:49 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

'Happiness, Like Water' Based On Nigerian-American Writer's Reality

Montreux Rotholtz Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 7:43 pm

Nigerian-American author Chinelo Okparanta was shortlisted for this year's prestigious Caine Prize for African Writing. But she says that initially, writing short stories wasn't a style she thought she'd be good at.

"When I started, I thought I was a novelist, and I had written some short stories and I thought that they failed at being whatever short stories should be," Okparanta tells Tell Me More's guest host Celeste Headlee. "I'm not sure how it ended up that I somehow learned to write a short story."

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Shots - Health News
1:36 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Violence Causes Doctors Without Borders To Exit Somalia

Somali women and children wait to get medicine in July 2008, from a clinic run by Doctors Without Borders about 20 miles south of Mogadishu.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 8:05 am

The aid group Doctors Without Borders said Wednesday that it's closing all operations in Somalia after 22 years because of the increase in violent attacks and abuse against its staff.

"This is the most difficult announcement that I've had to make as MSF president," Dr. Unni Karunakara said at a press conference from Kenya. "Respect for humanitarian principles no longer exists in Somalia today."

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Monkey See
1:35 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

When A 'Total Eclipse' Leads To Some Serious Exposure

Christina Bianco performs with some regularity at Jim Caruso's Cast Party and 54 Below's Backstage open-mic night in New York City. She's currently in the cast of Newsical the Musical, the current-events lampoon running at Theatre Row.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 3:40 pm

So this here "Total Eclipse of the Heart" video has blown the heck up, tallying a million-plus YouTube plays since Scandal showrunner Shonda Rhimes tweeted a link to it. It's made the rounds of LaughingSquid and Gawker and the like, and if you haven't watched it, do yourself a favor and get that done, because you'll thank me.

I'll wait.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
1:29 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

The Idea That Changed The World: 100 Years Of Quantum Jumps

Niels Bohr in September 1953
Keystone Getty Images

One hundred years ago Niels Bohr introduced the idea of quantum jumps with his model of the atom. Since then, and in unexpected ways, quantum physics has taken over the world.

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Live At The Village Vanguard
1:21 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Jimmy Cobb: Live At The Village Vanguard

Jimmy Cobb.
John Rogers for NPR johnrogersnyc.com

Originally published on Fri June 20, 2014 10:20 am

The drummer Jimmy Cobb is 84 — which, even if you didn't know his name, would signal that he's been around the jazz scene for a while. But he's been more than around: He was the drummer when Miles Davis recorded his late-'50s and early-'60s masterpieces, and then toured with Sarah Vaughan for nearly a decade. He's freelanced with just about every great of his generation.

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The Two-Way
1:20 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Jesse Jackson Jr. Sentenced To 30 Months In Prison

Former Illinois Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr., leaves federal court in Washington, D.C. on Wednesday. Jackson was sentenced to two and a half years in prison Wednesday after pleading guilty to scheming to spend $750,000 in campaign funds on TV's, restaurant dinners, an expensive watch and other costly personal items.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 5:56 pm

Jesse Jackson Jr., who pleaded guilty to misusing $750,000 in campaign funds, was sentenced to 30 months in prison plus three years of supervised release today, The Chicago Tribune and The Chicago Sun-Times are reporting.

Earlier during the sentencing hearing, the former Democratic congressman from Chicago and his wife wept, while apologizing for their failings.

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World Cafe
1:14 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Daughn Gibson On World Cafe

Daughn Gibson.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 5:24 pm

Daughn Gibson is the alter ego of Pennsylvania singer-songwriter Josh Martin. The former stoner-rock drummer took on his nom de plume as an homage to country legend Don Gibson, which makes sense: Martin's life thus far sounds like a country song. He's worked behind the counter in an adult book store, poured tall ones as a bartender and worked as a long-haul trucker.

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Parallels
1:13 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

French Maker Of Military Rafts Gets An American Identity

U.S. Marines with 4th Force Reconnaissance Company slide off F470 Combat Rubber Raiding Crafts during training in Waimanalo, Hawaii. The French company Zodiac has been the U.S. military's choice for inflatable rubber rafts for roughly two decades. Now the company is making the rafts in the U.S.
Lance Cpl. Reece E. Lodder Marine Corps Base Hawaii

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 8:40 am

For roughly two decades, the Zodiac has been the U.S. military's choice for inflatable rubber rafts. These rafts, especially the high-end model F470, are not the recreational rafts you take out to the lake on a Sunday, says Lionel Boudeau, the head of Zodiac's North America operations.

"It is used for a large variety of missions, like assault landings, infiltration and exfiltration," he says. "It can be deployed from the shore or deployed from the air by an aircraft, a helicopter, by a submarine. It is used by special forces and regular Army."

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The Salt
12:42 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

How A Seed Saver Discovered One Of Our Favorite Tomatoes

A Cherokee purple tomato grown in Alaska in 2011.
Sherry Shiesl Tatiana's TOMATObase

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 3:04 pm

Fortunately for those of us who are suckers for novelty, every year fruits and vegetables seem to come in more bewitching colors, shapes and flavors. Lately, we've been tickled by the cotton candy grape and the vibrant orange Turkish eggplant.

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Asia
12:19 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

On Mount Everest, Sherpa Guides Bear The Brunt Of The Danger

Lhamu Chhiki's husband, Chhewang Nima, summited Mount Everest 19 times. He died while leading a private expedition on Mount Baruntse in 2010.
Courtesy of Grayson Schaffer

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 1:46 pm

The Sherpa people of Nepal have become famous for guiding mountain climbers up some of the world's highest peaks, especially Mount Everest. And while Sherpa guides earn relatively good pay for their work, they and their families pay a price in death and injury. According to Grayson Schaffer, a senior editor and writer for Outside magazine, a Sherpa working above Everest's base camp is nearly 10 times more likely to die than a commercial fisherman, the most dangerous, nonmilitary occupation in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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All Tech Considered
12:14 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

'The New York Times' Site, Apps Return After Two-Hour Outage

The New York Times headquarters in New York City.
Ramin Talaie Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 8:40 am

One of the world's most trusted sources for news is back up, after an internal outage knocked it out for nearly two hours on Wednesday morning. The New York Times' main site and mobile app went down a little after 11 a.m. ET, when users who tried to visit received a "Service Unavailable" message.

The news organization's Twitter account sent this message, before the site returned:

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The Two-Way
11:29 am
Wed August 14, 2013

The Knuckleball Can Devastate, So Why Don't All Pitchers Throw It?

The knuckleball grip used by Boston Red Sox pitcher Steven Wright. Good fingernails are important.
Marvin Fong The Plain Dealer /Landov

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 6:17 pm

This sports news got our attention this week:

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This Is NPR
11:17 am
Wed August 14, 2013

FAQ: More Details About The New NPR Home Page

NPR

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 11:36 am

Why redesign the NPR home page?

See our welcome post. Then watch this video.

On what platforms can I explore the new home page?

The new home page is "responsive," optimizing for phones, tablets and desktops. You're welcome to visit NPR.org on all of those platforms. We have previously redesigned our story pages and blog pages in this fashion.

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The Protojournalist
11:15 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Can Adhesive Bandages Be Racist?

NPR

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 2:26 pm

Living in Malawi, Rachel Marie Stone — an American teaching in a seminary — has realized that most adhesive bandages are the peachy, apricottish color of her Caucasian skin.

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