World

Shots - Health News
1:44 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

What's In A Name? More Drugs For Babies If It's GERD

Frequent spitting up affects about half of babies under six months, but it's usually not gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 12:00 pm

Say your one-month-old baby is spitting up and crying a lot. Your usual bag of infant-soothing tricks hasn't worked, and you're worried that there's something wrong with her.

So you head to the pediatrician, who tells you that your otherwise healthy child has gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD. Would receiving this medical diagnosis make you more interested in giving her drugs than if you never heard the word "disease"?

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The Two-Way
1:11 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

U.S. Adds F-22 Fighter Jets To Military Exercise In South Korea

The United States has sent two F-22 Raptor fighter jets to take part military drills in South Korea, a move that is meant to show U.S. commitment to the defense of the region from its North Korean neighbor, a Pentagon spokesman told the Associated Press.

Also on Monday, South Korean President Park Geun-hye appeared to give her country's military permission to strike back at any attack from the North.

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The Two-Way
1:07 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Caroline Kennedy To Be Ambassador To Japan? Talk Grows

Caroline Kennedy in May 2012.
Brian Snyder Reuters /Landov

There's been chatter in Washington for the past month or so about Caroline Kennedy being tapped to be the next ambassador to Japan.

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The Picture Show
12:20 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Finding Beauty In A Baseball, After The Last Pitch

From Don Hamerman's series Baseballs.
Courtesy of Don Hamerman

Originally published on Wed April 3, 2013 10:17 am

As a new season of Major League Baseball begins, one photographer focuses on baseballs past — that is, baseballs that have lain dormant well after their last pitch.

For years, photographer Don Hamerman walked his dog near an old baseball diamond in Stamford, Conn. And in all different seasons, in all kinds of weather, Hamerman picked up old baseballs.

He brought them back to his studio, where they sat around for years until he finally decided to start photographing them in 2005.

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The Two-Way
11:47 am
Mon April 1, 2013

Patent Ruling In India Could Boost Exports Of Cheap Medicine To Third World

A Novartis office in Mumbai, India.
Divyakant Solanki EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 5:17 pm

A decision by India's Supreme Court to reject Novartis AG's bid to patent a version of one cancer drug could lead to more exports of cheap medicine from that country to "poor people across the developing world," the BBC writes.

NPR's Julie McCarthy tells our Newscast Desk that the ruling, announced Monday, ends a six-year legal battle that has been closely watched by pharmaceutical firms, humanitarian aid organizations and generic drug manufacturers.

She adds that:

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Deceptive Cadence
8:47 am
Mon April 1, 2013

Marching To 'Easter Monday On The White House Lawn'

President Barack Obama helps a young participant roll an egg during the White House Easter Egg Roll on the South Lawn of the White House on April 9, 2012 in Washington, DC.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

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The Two-Way
7:33 am
Mon April 1, 2013

It's Almost Cicada Time! Help Radiolab Track #Swarmageddon

A newly emerged adult cicada dries its wings on a tree in Washington, D.C.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 1:39 pm

If history proves correct, Magicicada Brood II will emerge this spring after living underground for 17 years.

In many places along the Eastern Seaboard — from North Carolina to Connecticut — the cicadas will fill the skies, breed and then quickly die. National Geographic points out that historically, this group, known as Brood II, has been so prolific that picking up their carcasses can sometimes feel like raking leaves in the fall.

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The Two-Way
7:16 am
Mon April 1, 2013

Book News: Shakespeare Was A Tax Evader And Food Hoarder, Researchers Say

William Shakespeare, brilliant playwright and cutthroat businessman?
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 7:18 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
7:06 am
Mon April 1, 2013

If Something Smells Funny, Remember What Day It Is

Spaghetti is "harvested" in 1961 from the ceiling of an Italian restaurant in London. A 1957 April Fools Day report by the BBC about spaghetti trees fooled many, and has been famous since.
Keystone/Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 5:59 pm

  • From 'Morning Edition': 'Hootie and the Time Travelers'

Google Nose was unveiled Monday morning. It's "the new scentsation in search." Just put your nose to the screen to sample "15M+ sentibytes." Google's also offering new options to its "I'm Feeling Lucky" button, including "I'm Feeling Wonderful" and "I'm Feeling Hungry."

Twitter is out with "Twttr," a version that only lets you use consonants.

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Europe
6:45 am
Mon April 1, 2013

Researchers Look Into Shakespeare's Finances

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 6:48 am

They report the great playwright did not entirely make his living in the theater. He was also a merchant, a moneylender and a tax dodger. In 1598, he was prosecuted for hoarding grain during a famine.

Europe
6:41 am
Mon April 1, 2013

Moscow Man Can't Wait For Summer Weather

The man was picketing Moscow's Hydrometeorological Center wearing swim trunks and holding a sign that read: "Let Summer Come Faster." Russian forecasters now predict that "everything will thaw fast" — adding, "we are meeting him halfway."

Political Junkie
6:08 am
Mon April 1, 2013

It's ScuttleButton Time!

Ken Rudin collection

I'm on vacation this week, and thus no Political Junkie column, Talk of the Nation appearance or podcast for me. But giving up ScuttleButton? No way.

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Africa
4:42 am
Mon April 1, 2013

Nelson Mandel's Condition Seems To Be Improving

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 6:24 am

Public expressions of concern are on full display as South Africans monitor the hospitalization of anti-apartheid hero and former president Nelson Mandela. The 94 year old is being treated for pneumonia.

Middle East
4:42 am
Mon April 1, 2013

Syrian Government Stronghold Raqqa Falls To Rebels

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 6:16 am

The Syrian provincial capital of Raqqa is the first city to fall entirely to rebels who are fighting to bring down President Bashar Assad's regime. We have the story of Mohammad Abdel Aziz, who witnessed the fall of Raqqa from inside a prison cell.

Business
4:42 am
Mon April 1, 2013

Novartis Loses Patent Battle In India

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 8:50 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with a patent ruling that may affect millions.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

Business
4:42 am
Mon April 1, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 8:50 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And today's last word in business is one of this year's contenders for highest profile April Fools joke.

The video-sharing website YouTube announced yesterday it's shutting down.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

In a video message, YouTube executives said that the whole site was actually designed as an eight-year contest to find the best video on the web. Well, eight years are up. And now panel of experts, the company said, will spend the next decade watching everything uploaded on the site to choose a winner.

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Deceptive Cadence
3:18 am
Mon April 1, 2013

Singing The Praises Of Pre-Dawn Walks

Jazz composer Maria Schneider (left) and soprano Dawn Upshaw collaborated on the new album Winter Morning Walks.
Jimmy & Dena Katz Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 8:50 am

Minnesota-born composer Maria Schneider has called New York home for more than 30 years, and she knows how to find nature in the middle of the city. Because her new album is called Winter Morning Walks, we walked to her favorite bird-watching spot in Central Park on a chilly February morning.

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Research News
3:16 am
Mon April 1, 2013

Why Not Apologizing Makes You Feel Better

Illustration by NPR

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 8:50 am

To err is human.

So is refusing to apologize for those errors.

From toddlers and talk show hosts to preteens and presidents, we all know people who have done stupid, silly and evil things, then squared their jaws and told the world they've done nothing wrong.

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The Salt
3:16 am
Mon April 1, 2013

Journey To Java's 'Tempeh Village': Where Soybean Cakes Are Born

Preparing the soy beans to be fermented
Anthony?

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 8:50 am

For centuries, Asia has been home to sophisticated vegetarian cultures. In recent years, Americans have gradually discovered cooking with meat substitutes like tofu and an Indonesia soybean cake called tempeh.

Tempeh is known for being versatile. There's an almost endless variety of ways to cook it. My favorite is perhaps one of the simplest: Cut it into thin slices, cover it in spices and crushed coriander seeds, and pan-fry it in a little oil until it's golden brown.

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Asia
3:15 am
Mon April 1, 2013

Pakistan's Ambitious Program To Re-Educate Militants

Pakistani men who worked for the Taliban attend a class at Mishal, an army-run rehabilitation center in Pakistan's Swat Valley, on July 5, 2011. This and similar centers are trying to re-educate men taken in by the Taliban, who ruled Swat before the military drove out the insurgents in 2009.
Farooq Naeem AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 8:50 am

A Pakistani army officer named Col. Zeshan is giving a tour of a jihadi rehabilitation center secreted in the hills of northwest Pakistan's Swat Valley.

"This place was also captured by the Taliban," he says, walking me around the heavily guarded complex. "The army took over this place from them ... when the war was going on."

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