World

NPR Story
5:00 pm
Sun February 17, 2013

How Safe Is Our Meat?

Twenty years ago this week, a toddler named Riley Detwiler died from exposure to E. coli, one of four children who succumbed to an outbreak that sickened hundreds in the Northwest. That event took the country by surprise and cast a bright light on the problem of food-borne illness. Host Jacki Lyden speaks with Riley's father, Darin Detwiler; Carol Tucker, foreman of the Food Policy Institute; former Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy; and New York Times journalist Michael Moss.

NPR Story
5:00 pm
Sun February 17, 2013

Three-Minute Fiction: Round 10

Sunday's readings from Round 10 of our Three-Minute Fiction contest comes from Jason Scherschligt of Plymouth, Minn., and Kama Brown of Ellisville, Mo.

Three-Minute Fiction
4:31 pm
Sun February 17, 2013

You Have Reached Sarah Wellman

iStockphoto.com

Oh, um, hey Sarah, this is Brad Davis from Slingshot and, um, I'm pleased --

Hold on: your greeting there on your voice mail kind of threw me off. Did it seriously say "you have reached Sarah Wellman. Please leave a message"? It did, didn't it? Wow. OK, I don't want to be rude, but, c'mon: "You have reached Sarah Wellman"? Seriously? I mean, isn't that exactly the opposite of what I've done? Because I have not reached you, Sarah Wellman. I obviously have not.

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Three-Minute Fiction
4:30 pm
Sun February 17, 2013

It's Not OK To Act This Way

iStockphoto.com

Hi Mom, it's me, I guess you're out. I'm trying to follow this recipe and I was hoping you would know what I could substitute for a half cup of butter. I figure probably oil or something but it would be nice to know from someone who has first hand experience. I tried the Internet but Google results can be really wide-ranging and I never know which advice to consider. I remember when I was fourteen and I Googled "How to French braid hair" and there were more than three million results.

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The Salt
3:13 pm
Sun February 17, 2013

Should You Be Worried About Your Meat's Phosphorus Footprint?

A tractor spreads fertilizer at a dairy farm in Morrinsville, New Zealand.
Sandra Mu Getty Images

Originally published on Tue February 19, 2013 10:36 am

If you've ever played around with one of those carbon or water footprint calculators, you probably know that meat production demands a lot from the environment — a lot of oil, water and land. (Check out the infographic we did on what goes into a hamburger last year for Meat Week.)

But have you thought about your meat's phosphorus footprint? Probably not.

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All Tech Considered
3:01 pm
Sun February 17, 2013

Want To Keep Your Messages Private? There's An App For That

Cell phone communication can be hacked, tapped or otherwise tampered with. A new app aims to change that.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Sun February 17, 2013 8:46 pm

It sounds like something out of a spy movie: A new app called Silent Circle allows users to "burn" sensitive messages sent on their phones.

Jon Callas, one of the people who developed the app, says the idea is pretty simple.

"It's a timer. So you can say, one hour; seven minutes. Whatever," Callas tells Jacki Lyden, host of weekends on All Things Considered.

It's called a "burn notice." When the time's up, the text is erased from both the sender and receiver's phones.

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Author Interviews
1:59 pm
Sun February 17, 2013

Days With John And Yoko: A Writer Remembers

John Lennon and his wife, Yoko Ono, pictured above in January 1970, are the subjects of Jonathan Cott's new book Days That I'll Remember. Cott met Lennon in 1968 and was friends with the couple.
Anthony Cox Getty Images

Originally published on Sun February 17, 2013 5:00 pm

As the European editor of Rolling Stone, Jonathan Cott spent his time interviewing legendary musicians like Mick Jagger and Pete Townshend. But in 1968, he finally got the opportunity to meet his hero, John Lennon. Cott was nervous.

"He said, 'There's nothing to be nervous about,'" Cott recalls. "'It's going to be OK, and we're doing it together, and that's what really matters.'"

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Movies I've Seen A Million Times
1:43 pm
Sun February 17, 2013

The Movie Connie Britton Has 'Seen A Million Times'

Goldie Hawn and Chevy Chase in the 1978 movie Foul Play.
Anonymous AP

Originally published on Sun February 17, 2013 5:00 pm

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

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Monkey See
1:33 pm
Sun February 17, 2013

Man Of Tomorrow: Superman, Orson Scott Card And Me

A new version of Superman, penned by Orson Scott Card, has caused a stir in the comics world.
HO AP Photo/DC Comics

Let's make this perfectly clear at the outset: I don't work for NPR, and what I'm about to say doesn't represent NPR. I'm but a lowly freelancer they're dumb enough to publish a bunch, and what I say now I say as me, which is to say:

1. An inveterate Superman nerd, and

2. A gay dude.

DC Comics has hired Orson Scott Card to write the first two issues of a new digital-first Superman comic. I won't be reading it.

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Opinion
12:45 pm
Sun February 17, 2013

Man Of Tomorrow: Superman, Orson Scott Card And Me

Originally published on Sun February 17, 2013 5:00 pm

Glen Weldon is a freelance writer and regular contributor to Monkey See.

Let's make this perfectly clear at the outset: I don't work for NPR, and what I'm about to say doesn't represent NPR. I'm but a lowly freelancer they're dumb enough to publish a bunch, and what I say now I say as me, which is to say:

1. An inveterate Superman nerd, and

2. A gay dude.

DC Comics has hired Orson Scott Card to write the first two issues of a new digital-first Superman comic. I won't be reading it.

Read more
The Two-Way
9:07 am
Sun February 17, 2013

At Least 15 Dead As Car Bombs Explode In Baghdad

Iraqis inspect the scene of a car bomb attack in the Ameen neighborhood in eastern Baghdad on Sunday.
Khalid Mohammed AP

Originally published on Sun February 17, 2013 11:33 am

At least two dozen people are dead and dozens injured Sunday in the Iraqi capital, Baghdad, after multiple car bombs exploded within minutes of each other in mainly Shiite areas.

NPR's Kelly McEvers is reporting on the blasts for our Newscast unit.

"The explosions targeted shops and outdoor markets in Shiite districts around the city. After the blast helicopters were circling over many parts of the city.

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The Two-Way
8:48 am
Sun February 17, 2013

Pope Blesses Faithful At Vatican For First Time Since Resignation Announcement

Pope Benedict XVI acknowledges a cheering crowd of faithful and pilgrims during the Angelus prayer from the window of his apartments at the Vatican on Sunday.
Domenico Stinellis AP

Pope Benedict XVI blessed tens of thousands of cheering faithful Sunday for the first time since he announced his resignation last week.

NPR's Sylvia Poggioli reported on the event for our Newscast unit. Here's what she said:

"Under hazy skies, St. Peter's Square was packed with pilgrims, tourists and curiosity seekers.

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Middle East
6:13 am
Sun February 17, 2013

Rebels Make Gains In Ongoing Fighting In Syria

Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin talks with NPR's Deb Amos about the latest from the fighting in Syria, where rebels continue to fight President Bashar Assad's army. Most recently, rebels captured the largest electricity producing dam, parts of an major oil field and military airfields in the north.

Music News
6:13 am
Sun February 17, 2013

Haitian Musicians Get By With A Little Help From Their Friends

Singer-songwriter Amos Dolce on the set of the video for his song "Haiti, Haiti," which Konbit Mizik produced.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue February 19, 2013 9:23 am

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Strange News
6:13 am
Sun February 17, 2013

How A Hockey Blog Got The Scoop On Russia's Meteorite

Originally published on Tue February 19, 2013 9:04 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Fans of the National Hockey League's Washington Capitals were likely the first to learn of the meteorite that exploded over central Russia this past week - that is, if they were reading the Russian Machine Never Breaks. It's a website devoted to the Washington Capitals hockey team. Chris Gordon and Peter Hassett blog for the site, and they join us in our studios to explain how they unexpectedly broke this story. Welcome to the program, guys.

CHRIS GORDON: Thank you so much.

PETER HASSETT: Thank you.

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Politics
6:13 am
Sun February 17, 2013

Looking At The Realities Of Passing New Gun Control Legislation

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The fate of new gun control legislation for now lies in the U.S. Senate. And we turn to Senator Patrick Leahy. He's a Democrat from Vermont and the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee.

SENATOR PATRICK LEAHY: This is the first Judiciary Committee hearing of the 113th Congress.

MARTIN: His committee has been holding hearings to try to come up with possible ways to address gun violence.

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Author Interviews
6:13 am
Sun February 17, 2013

In 'The Searchers,' A Hunt For The Western Film

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

It is one of the most iconic American Westerns of all time. "The Searchers," directed by John Ford, hit the big screen in 1956. John Wayne starred in the lead role of the film as Ethan Edwards.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "THE SEARCHERS")

JOHN WAYNE: (as Ethan Edwards) Our turning back don't mean nothing. On the long run, she's alive. She's safe.

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Economy
6:13 am
Sun February 17, 2013

Working Late: In Tough Economy, Retirement Gets Pushed Back

Originally published on Sun February 17, 2013 2:05 pm

As more Americans begin to feel the financial strains of the weak economy, the retirement age is creeping up. Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin speaks with NPR's Ina Jaffe about her Morning Edition series, "Working Late."

Afghanistan
5:20 am
Sun February 17, 2013

Searching For Ibrahim

Ibrahim Gumus was 16 when he ran away from his home in Turkey to join al-Qaida. This is the photo his father — who traveled to Afghanistan to try and find him — carries in his wallet.
Courtesy of Farhettin Gumus

Originally published on Sun February 17, 2013 6:23 am

Over the years, al-Qaida has recruited young men in the Arab world, Africa and Central Asia, including Afghanistan. The group has also had some success in luring followers from Turkey.

Last month, Fahrettin Gumus, a retired security guard from Turkey's northwestern province of Bursa, went to Afghanistan in search of his son, who he had last heard from three years earlier.

The small-framed 57-year old says he often worried about his son Ibrahim, but he never through he'd go through with his plan to join al-Qaida.

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Games & Humor
4:36 am
Sun February 17, 2013

Dear Mr. President, What's Your Name?

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Mon February 18, 2013 12:14 am

On-air challenge: In honor of Presidents Day, every answer is the last name of a U.S. president. You will be given a word or phrase that is a president's last name with two letters changed. You name the president. For example, given "Carpet," the answer would be "Carter."

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