World

Afghanistan
2:55 am
Wed May 8, 2013

Afghans Confront Senstive Issue Of Ethnicity

Saifulzul Husseini (right) works in Dashti Barchi, a Hazara neighborhood of Kabul. He believes that ethnicity should be listed on the new identity card.
Sean Carberry NPR

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 11:43 am

In Afghanistan, where most people are illiterate and live in areas without paved roads or regular electricity, a state-of-the-art smart-chip ID card may seem extravagant. But the government believes it can help with everything from census data to voter registration to health care.

The format of the proposed card, however, is fueling debate over ethnicity and identity at a time when anxiety is already high over the drawdown of NATO troops.

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All Tech Considered
2:53 am
Wed May 8, 2013

Will Tweaking Windows 8 Be Enough To Revive The PC?

Microsoft's Windows 8 operating system was criticized when it was released last year for features some said didn't mesh with a desktop PC environment. The company has indicated that it will address some of those issues in an upcoming update.
Richard Drew AP

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 11:43 am

When Microsoft introduced Windows 8 last year, the software giant billed the new operating system as one of the most critical releases in its history. The system would bridge the gap between personal computers and the fast-growing mobile world of tablets and smartphones.

But this week, the company sent signals that it might soon alter Windows 8 to address some early criticism of the operating system.

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The Salt
2:50 am
Wed May 8, 2013

Rat 'Mutton' And Bird Flu: Strange Days For Meat Eaters In Shanghai

A woman wearing a mask rides past a KFC restaurant in Shanghai last month. Food scares and the bird flu haven't stopped many chicken lovers in the city from visiting KFC and other restaurants.
Aly Song Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 11:43 am

The past couple of months have been unsettling ones for meat eaters in Shanghai.

In March, more than 16,000 dead pigs showed up in a stretch of the Huangpu River — a main source of the city's drinking water.

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Shots - Health News
2:49 am
Wed May 8, 2013

Officials Prepare For Another Flu Pandemic — Just In Case

Scientists in the U.S. are growing the H7N9 virus in the laboratory to help with vaccine development.
James Gathany CDC/Douglas E. Jordan

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 11:43 am

There's been a buzz of activity at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta since scientists got their first samples of a new bird flu virus from China four weeks ago.

Already they've prepared "seed strains" of the virus, called H7N9, and distributed them to vaccine manufacturers so the companies can grow them up and make them into experimental flu vaccine.

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Sports
10:03 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

Ladies, Want Women's Sports To Get More Attention? Pony Up

Indiana Fever guard Erin Phillips (right) drives past Phoenix Mercury forward DeWanna Bonner during the first half of their WNBA basketball game Aug. 25.
Matt York AP

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 11:47 am

Fans of women's sports often maintain that female athletics get short shrift from the media, so it had to be something of a surprise gift when ESPN presented the start of the WNBA's draft live.

This happened as it was announced that after two abject failures in the past decade, yet another professional soccer league for women will dare venture forth in the United States.

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The Two-Way
7:06 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

Study: 'Fossil' Words Are Older Than We Thought

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 8:58 pm

The origin of some of the words we use today goes back much further than scientists once thought, suggesting an Ice Age-era proto-language that spawned many of the world's contemporary linguistic groups, according to a new study by a group of U.K.-based scientists.

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The Two-Way
6:58 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew Gets A New Signature

Jacob "Jack" Lew's signature, on the 2012 "Mid-Session Review" of the federal budget. He was director of the Office of Management and Budget at the time.
WhiteHouse.gov

Originally published on Wed May 8, 2013 9:49 am

Back in January, when Jacob "Jack" Lew was a mere nominee for the position of Secretary of the Treasury, we fretted about his signature. (It is, after all, displayed on the dollar.) It looked like a doodle, or as New York Magazine called it, a "slinky that has lost its spring."

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Classics in Concert
6:40 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

Spring For Music: National Symphony Orchestra At Carnegie Hall

Conductor Christoph Eschenbach and the National Symphony Orchestra gave the final performance in this year's Spring for Music Festival at Carnegie Hall on May 11, 2013. The program was of all 20th-century Russian music: Shchedrin's Slava, Slava; Schnittke's Viola Concerto; and Shostakovich's Fifth Symphony.
Torsten Kjellstrand for NPR

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 10:17 am

Program:

  • SHCHEDRIN: Slava, Slava
  • SCHNITTKE: Viola Concerto
  • SHOSTAKOVICH: Symphony No. 5

  • National Symphony Orchestra
  • Christoph Eschenbach, music director
  • David Aaron Carpenter, viola
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The Two-Way
5:50 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

Colorado Theater Shooting Suspect Will Enter Insanity Plea

In a court filing today, lawyers for Colorado theater shooting suspect James Holmes said he intended to plead not guilty by reason of insanity.

Holmes will enter the plea, the court filing says, during a hearing on May 13.

Holmes is accused of opening fire in a crowded Aurora, Colo. movie theater, killing 12 people and injuring 70.

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It's All Politics
5:29 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

Congressional Hearings Put Renewed Focus On Benghazi Attack

Originally published on Tue May 7, 2013 10:56 pm

It has been nearly eight months since attacks on the U.S. diplomatic post in Benghazi, Libya, killed four Americans, including Ambassador Christopher Stevens.

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The Two-Way
5:29 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

With Senate Approval, Delaware Poised To Allow Gay Marriage

Originally published on Wed May 8, 2013 2:13 pm

The Delaware Senate passed a bill that would legalize same-sex marriages. Gov. Jack Markell said he would sign the bill, which means that the state is poised to become the 11th in the country to allow gay marriages.

The vote comes less than a week after Rhode Island Gov. Lincoln Chafee signed a similar measure into law.

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Asia
5:26 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

Are Those North Korean Long-Range Missiles For Real?

What appears to be a missile is carried during a mass military parade in Pyongyang, North Korea, on April 15, 2012. Some analysts say the half-dozen missiles showcased at the military parade were fakes.
Ng Han Guan AP

Originally published on Tue May 7, 2013 10:56 pm

When President Obama met with South Korean President Park Geun-hye on Tuesday, one item was high on the agenda: how to handle North Korea, which has in recent months threatened to strike both countries.

Obama called such threats "a dead end."

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World
5:26 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

Kerry Appeals To Russia To Help End Syrian Civil War

Originally published on Tue May 7, 2013 10:56 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

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Middle East
5:26 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

Bishops Remain Missing After Capture In Syria

Originally published on Tue May 7, 2013 10:56 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

As Orthodox Christians around the world celebrated Easter this week, the Orthodox communities in Syria and neighboring Lebanon postponed festivities. Instead, they gathered in churches to pray for the safe return of two bishops kidnapped outside the Syrian city of Aleppo last month.

While the Syrian opposition and the regime of President Bashar al-Assad continue to trade blame for the abduction, the bishop's whereabouts remains a mystery. NPR's Susannah George has our story from Beirut.

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Code Switch
5:23 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

Are We Laughing With Charles Ramsey?

Charles Ramsey talks to media Tuesday as people congratulate him for having helped some women get out of a Cleveland home. Amanda Berry, Gina DeJesus, Michelle Knight and a 6-year-old girl were rescued from the house.
Scott Shaw The Plain Dealer/Landov

Originally published on Tue May 7, 2013 7:45 pm

It's hard out here for a black man the Internet accidentally thrusts into the limelight. Those 15 minutes ain't no joke.

Charles Ramsey, the Cleveland man who helped Amanda Berry escape from her captor and free her fellow captives, is already a full-fledged Thing On The Internet, primarily owing to a live local television news interview. During that interview, Ramsey proved himself a fantastic storyteller, and he kept it extra-extra-real.

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This Is NPR
5:20 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

Paparazzi Descend On Wait Wait... Cinecast!

An action shot from the cinecast.
Ryan Muir NPR

Originally published on Mon May 13, 2013 9:33 am

On May 2, Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me! beamed our beloved news-quiz show live into movie theaters across the country, from Seattle to Miami.

Fans gathered to experience Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me! like never before. Just like the radio version, this big-screen debut created a communal experience that was big fun.

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The Two-Way
5:14 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

Matt Groening's Mother, Inspiration For Marge Simpson, Dies

The inspiration for Marge Simpson, from the animated series The Simpsons, died April 22. Margaret Groening, the mother of Simpsons' creator Matt Groening, was 94.
AP

Originally published on Tue May 7, 2013 6:57 pm

"Margaret Groening died peacefully in her sleep on April 22, 2013, in Portland."

That paid obituary, which ran Monday in The Oregonian, marked the life of the woman who served as the inspiration for one of the best-known characters on television and arguably pop culture: the beehive-coiffed Marge Simpson.

Groening was 94.

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It's All Politics
5:08 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

Both Sides Hopeful In Last Hours Of Sanford, Colbert Busch Race

Democrat Elizabeth Colbert Busch and her Republican opponent, former South Carolina Gov. Mark Sanford, debate in Charleston, S.C., on April 29.
Randall Hill Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue May 7, 2013 9:58 pm

Updated at 9:29 pm ET --- Former South Carolina Republican governor Mark Sanford easily beat Democrat Elizabeth Colbert Busch to regain the House seat he once held.

For Sanford, the victory in the strongly Republican 1st Congressional District was sure to be widely viewed as a personal redemption. Sanford left the governor's mansion in 2009 after an extramarital affair with an Argentinian woman who is now his fiancee led to the breakup of his marriage.

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The Two-Way
5:06 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

Rate Of U.S. Gun Violence Has Fallen Since 1993, Study Says

The U.S. rate of gun homicides and other crimes fell after 1993, according to two studies released Tuesday. But a survey showed that only 12 percent of Americans said they felt gun homicides had fallen.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 7, 2013 6:58 pm

Since 1993, the United States has seen a drop in the rate of homicides and other violence involving guns, according to two new studies released Tuesday. Using government data, analysts saw a steep drop for violence in the 1990s, they saw more modest drops in crime rates since 2000.

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The Two-Way
4:38 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

Pakistani Politician Imran Khan Falls From Lift During Campaign

An Imran Khan supporter prays on Tuesday for his quick recovery after he was rushed to a hospital with head injuries.
Asif Hassan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 7, 2013 7:20 pm

Pakistani cricketer turned politician Imran Khan is said to be OK after he fell from a lift during a campaign rally in Lahore on Tuesday.

Al-Jazeera reports that Khan "fell 14 feet as he was stepping off an improvised forklift that was raising him to the top of the platform."

Khan, who heads the Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf, or PTI, party, was shown bleeding from the head after the fall.

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